Avery Hopes New Ads Will Stick | Adweek Avery Hopes New Ads Will Stick | Adweek
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Avery Hopes New Ads Will Stick

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Office and stationery maker Avery Dennison Corp. is launching its first national TV campaign this week.

On Sunday, the company—which sells to both businesses and consumers—will air a series of spots, via Doner, which highlight a new line of stationery products. For example, one spot shows a woman in need of a shipping label to complete a last-minute, “rush” order. She takes a box from a postal worker who just arrives, prints out an Avery label, and sticks it on top of the used box. “I printed the new label and it completely blocked the old label. You can’t see through it,” the woman proclaims, referring to Avery's “true block” label-covering technology.

The ads focus on how Avery products are often the “little things that make a big difference for people,” said Todd Thompson, the company's vp of marketing and R&D. The message is particularly relevant since cash-strapped consumers are looking for "real value and real performance," versus the "conspicuous consumption of years past," Thompson said.

Avery had previously relied on interactive and one-on-one sampling efforts to market its retail office and consumer products. But now, Thompson said, the brand is turning to national advertising for the first time to prevent consumers from trading down to private label or cheaper products.

The TV spots will run on TLC, ABC, Food Network and HGTV. Avery also made print buys in the September issues of Real Simple, Working Women and Parenting to reach its target consumer: working moms.

The brand is also using social media to reach moms. A new Facebook page, called “Organization of Moms,” has been formed to provide “time-saving tips to help make life easier,” per the company.

With the debut of a national campaign and new office supply products launching over the next 18 months, Avery hopes to spur growth in a category that’s been “pretty sleepy and hasn’t had a lot of innovation” in recent years, Thompson said. He didn't reveal the cost of the campaign, but said it's "three times higher than anything we’ve ever done."