Agency of the Year: BBDO | Adweek
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Agency of the Year: BBDO

As many shops struggle to reinvent themselves, a transformed BBDO takes flight, scoring business and creative plaudits

BBDO worldwide CEO Andrew Robertson (l.) and chairman, CCO, North America David Lubars | Photo: Ben Shaul

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For any agency, to weather the flaccid global economy of recent years would be tough enough. But consider recovering from the loss of one of your largest and longest-standing accounts on top of that.

BBDO stuck by Chrysler Group through its bankruptcy only to suffer the automaker’s defection in January of last year. Detroit was one of the agency’s largest domestic offices outside New York, and its closing and the layoff of nearly 500 staffers were a low point for the Omnicom shop.

Since then, Adweek’s Global Agency of the Year for 2011 has more than recovered from the hit, this year enjoying a bump in global revenue of 18 percent to an estimated $2.47 billion, on 15 percent greater U.S. revenue of about $690 million. BBDO estimates that since March 2009, it has won 90 percent of the global pitches in which it was a finalist, including major reviews such as S.C. Johnson (a win shared with Ogilvy & Mather) and ExxonMobil.

But the numbers are only part of the story. BBDO was the most recognized network for creative and effectiveness at Cannes this year, and the most awarded at the CLIO Awards.

“We were dealing with a ghastly economy and the loss of Chrysler. One of the things I am most proud of is that given all of that, we could have been forgiven if the quality of the creative slipped a little, but it didn’t,” says Andrew Robertson, BBDO’s perpetually tanned, suspenders-sporting worldwide CEO. “We’ve just had our fifth consecutive year as the most awarded network at Cannes. We’ve doubled down on the things we do best.”

Steve Pacheco, director of advertising for FedEx, which has done business with the agency for 22 years, says, “BBDO is not just a TV shop anymore. They’ve evolved in interactive and digital where they are as good as they are in TV. There’s a consistency and proven reliability where we know they’ll knock it out of the park with whatever they do for us.”

As other agencies struggle to reinvent themselves in a world of shifting business, technological, and geographic realities, BBDO has successfully transformed. For example, Proximity—its global digital, direct, and CRM network, with 67 offices in more than 50 countries—grew this year by more than 10 percent in the North American and Asia-Pacific markets, and 8 percent overall.

Omnicom, like its peers, has aggressively expanded in emerging markets, including the BRIC countries, and BBDO is playing a major role. Brazil’s AlmapBBDO this year was named Agency of the Year at Cannes for the second consecutive year. In Russia, BBDO and its associated companies now comprise the country’s largest agency group. Just three years ago, Josy Paul, chairman and chief creative officer of BBDO’s upstart in India, was running the office out of his car. Today, it boasts a staff of 70, and this year won four Cannes Lions, including one for effectiveness for Gillette.

Among other honors at Cannes this year, London’s AMV BBDO won the inaugural Grand Prix for Creative Effectiveness, for its work on Walkers crisps. In the spot, the brand, contending it can “make any sandwich that little bit more exciting,” proceeds to invade the sleepy English town of Sandwich with celebrities like Pam Anderson. The agency was also rated as the most effective agency network in the Global Effie Effectiveness Index. While awards shows tend to laud small, showcase accounts, BBDO has been singled out for its work on behalf of global clients including AT&T, FedEx, and Gillette.

“We’re one of the few agencies right now that doesn’t have an identity crisis,” says Troy Ruhanen, BBDO chairman and CEO of the Americas. “It’s the work, the work, the work. We know who we are, clients know who we are. One of the benefits is . . . you don’t focus on being introspective.”

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