Arnold Breaks New 'Always There' Campaign for ADT | Adweek Arnold Breaks New 'Always There' Campaign for ADT | Adweek
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ADT Provides Peace of Mind in New Ads From Arnold

'Always there' campaign breaks today

It's probably inevitable that ads about home security systems these days show how technology (read: your cell phone) connects you to your home. That's an element in a BBDO ad for AT&T Digital Life and now, a new ad for ADT from Arnold.

But where the BBDO ad, "Cabin," illustrates convenience, the Arnold spot, "Mind's Eye: Burglary," depicts relief. Arnold's work—the first since the agency won ADT's creative account in the fall—is part of a larger campaign that also includes radio and digital ads and breaks today. The tagline is, "Always there."

"Mind's Eye" opens with a fortysomething couple seated in a restaurant, looking at menus. The woman then looks up for a moment and says randomly, "I'm pretty sure the back door is locked ... Anyway, what could happen in couple of hours, right?"

That thought makes the man think of three burglars carrying loot from his home. They seem to appear a few feet away in the restaurant, but it's just a visualization of what's in his head. The bad guys vanish once the man taps his phone to lock the back door.

In the new campaign, ADT, which is expected to spend about $100 million in media this year, shifts toward meeting everyday security needs and away from grappling with worst case scenarios, according to Tony Wells, chief marketing officer at ADT. And that means the ads are less literal and delve into the mindset of core customers.

Wells described ADT's core target as homeowners with a household income of $75,000-$80,000 who live in houses that sell for anywhere between $175,000 and $350,000.

The launch ad seeks to develop a new brand voice but also has something to sell: an offer to install an ADT system for $79. That message, however, comes toward the end of the ad, after the couple's scene plays out.

Wells acknowledged the mobile device element in both the ADT and AT&T ads, but said the messages behind them were distinctly different.

"As I look at our spot it is the idea of having peace of mind and feeling secure versus having convenience or making your life easy. It's a different filter," Wells said. "The value [proposition for ADT] is really around no better security offering in the marketplace."

For the campaign, Arnold produced about a half-dozen TV and radio ads. In addition, digital agency SapientNitro created online ads that will begin to roll out in mid-February. MediaCom plans and buys media for ADT.

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