The Uneven Brilliance of Blake Edwards

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By Richard Horgan

Here’s an odd premise that Blake Edwards, who passed away in Santa Monica Wednesday at the age of 88, would have appreciated. The best first-wave remembrance comes not from Hollywood but rather Hollywood North.

Edwards would also have chuckled at the title of Macleans Magazine writer Jaime Weinman‘s piece, because it’s so true: “Blake Edwards: The Genius Without Quality Control.” No danger of an overly reverential obit here. While Weinman applauds Edwards’ Billy Wilder-like talents and flair for the visual, he also ponders one of the writer-director’s most prominent flaws:

The trouble is, along with the good scenes in bad movies, you get the bad scenes in good movies. And there are lots of them. I’m not a big fan of Breakfast at Tiffany’s, but it’s sort of emblematic: one of the most popular and beloved movies of his career, and every so often it’s interrupted by Mickey Rooney as a Japanese guy. Who thought this was a good idea?

We had not read any of Weinman’s stuff before today, but consider us new bookmarked fans. His blog is called “TV Guidance.”