YouTube Hack Fest Claims Its Next Victim: Microsoft

Exactly one week after the Sesame Street YouTube channel was hacked, with children’s videos replaced with porn, another major brand has fallen victim to YouTube hackers—Microsoft.

Exactly one week after the Sesame Street YouTube channel was hacked, with children’s videos replaced with porn, another major brand has fallen victim to YouTube hackers—Microsoft.  Microsoft’s YouTube channel was hacked on Sunday afternoon.  All of the videos were taken down from the site and personal videos were uploaded, asking viewers to submit content, including background images, for the channel.

The strange thing in this case was that the hacker claimed to not be a hacker at all.  He (or she) posted a message on the YouTube channel that read:

“I DID NOTHING WRONG I SIMPLY SIGNED INTO MY ACCOUNT THAT I MADE IN 2006 :/”

Sophos pointed out the following comment from one YouTube user, as a response to the “hacker’s” comment:

This is how he “hacked” the channel:

He legittly made the account Microsoft when youtube wasn’t that big but the REAL Microsoft probably asked YouTube to disable it and give it to them.  The flaw is that this account was probably still linked to this kid’s email and Microsoft forgot to change it or whatever.

So all this kid had to do was recover this account using his old email.

Not that hard.  Thats probably how the other big Channels got “hacked”.

Thumbs this up so people can see!

These sorts of crazy notions have got people asking whether Microsoft was “hacked” due to their own stupidity.  However, I don’t think I’m alone in saying that that story sounds a little farfetched to me.

That being said, I think that big brands on YouTube (actually anyone on YouTube) need to take precautions to avoid this sort of thing.  Choose a difficult password—not something that someone on the outside can easily decipher—and change the password frequently.  Be careful who you share the password with as well.  The entire company doesn’t need access to your YouTube account—just the people that actually add content to the site.  Jeremy Scott of Reel SEO writes, “The best defense against YouTube account takeovers is to have as difficult-to-crack a password as possible.”

Microsoft’s YouTube channel has since been restored, along with all the videos that were removed.  The channel design, however, has not yet been restored.  Check out a couple screenshots from yesterday’s Microsoft YouTube takeover below and let us know what you think.  Do you think we’ll be seeing another major YouTube hack fest next weekend as well?

Megan O’Neill is the resident web video enthusiast here at Social Times.  Megan covers everything from the latest viral videos to online video news and tips, and has a passion for bizarre, original and revolutionary content and ideas.