YouTube For Schools Strips Away Kitten and Fail Videos So Students Can Actually Learn Online

YouTube for Schools offers high quality educational videos on YouTube for free, in a controlled environment. Students can brows educational content from over 600 partners, including TED, Steve Spangler Science, Smithsonian and more, without the distraction of kittens or music videos.

The last time I visited my mom, who is a teacher, I saw her sitting at the dining room table watching YouTube videos, not for fun but for ideas and examples she could use in the classroom.  How cool, I thought, it is that teachers these days can use YouTube videos as inspiration for what they do with their students!  Starting this week, YouTube is making it easier than ever for teachers to discover worthwhile educational content on YouTube with YouTube for Schools.

Brian Troung, a Project Manager at YouTube, explains on the YouTube blog, “We’ve been hearing from teachers that they want to use the vast variety of educational videos on YouTube in their classrooms, but are concerned that students will be distracted by the latest music video or cute cat, or a video that wasn’t appropriate for students.  While schools that restrict access to YouTube may solve this distraction concern, they also limit access to hundreds of thousands of educational videos on YouTube that could help bring photosynthesis to life, or show what life was like in ancient Greece.”

To solve this problem and help teachers bring the power of video to the classroom as a tool for education, engagement and inspiration, YouTube has developed YouTube for Schools.  YouTube for Schools offers high quality educational videos on YouTube for free, in a controlled environment.  When a teacher logs in with their school’s Google account, students can browse educational content from over 600 partners, including TED, Steve Spangler Science, Smithsonian and more, without the distraction of kittens or music videos.

YouTube has worked with teachers to put together a variety of educational playlists, according to subject and grade level, from Math to Science, English Language Arts and more.

Find out more from the video below and let us know what you think.  If you have kids do their teachers use YouTube in the classroom?  If you work in education, what’s your take on YouTube for Schools?

Megan O’Neill is the resident web video enthusiast here at Social Times.  Megan covers everything from the latest viral videos to online video news and tips, and has a passion for bizarre, original and revolutionary content and ideas.