YouTube Copyright Violators Sent to Copyright School

When YouTube receives a copyright infringement notification about a particular uploaded video, the alleged infringer will have to complete “YouTube Copyright School,” which requires watching a tutorial video and passing a quiz to prove the user understands the copyright policies.

If you violate copyright policies on YouTube, you will not be charge a fine, but you will have to go to Copyright school via Google Copyright Tutorial. Then, you have to pass a test before you can continue to use the online video platform service.

The tutorial video is less than 5 minutes long and covers all the legal mumbo-jumbo. Google’s intent is to educate users about the online video platform’s copyright rules and heighten awareness about protecting copyrights.

Politico reports that YouTube has posted warnings to users specifying that the use of copyrighted materials — such as movies, music or other copyright works — could lead to termination of their account and possibly monetary damages if the copyright holder decides to sue.

The more recent updates allow users to watch a new tutorial video, which is entertaining and simple to understand, about YouTube’s copyright policies. Users can also access a redesigned copyright help center.

When YouTube receives a copyright infringement notification about a particular uploaded video, the alleged infringer will have to complete “YouTube Copyright School,” which requires watching a tutorial video and passing a quiz to prove the user understands the copyright policies.

If the offender proves to be a “good” YouTube user by a solid track record, Google will remove the copyright strikes against the user’s account. Google’s standard policy is to suspend YouTube users who have three copyright strikes.

You might wonder what started all this copyright mumbo-jumbo. Last week, lawmakers from House Intellectual Property Subcommittee, censured Google for falling short of preventing copyright infringement on websites that flagrantly offer copyrighted material and bogus goods.

My hat is off to Google for taking a step in the right direction. It will be interesting to see how Google’s new copyright policies weather the storm. Ah, matey!