WSJ.com Gets Technological

wsj.com12.22.08.jpgThe Wall Street Journal‘s Web site relaunched its technology section with a new focus on (what else?) blogs and columns.

A new Digits blog will ambitiously seek to cover “all aspects of technology,” while Walt Mossberg’s Personal Technology column will be the showcase feature of the Personal Technology section. (No points for naming creativity.)

Each of the paper’s 25 technology reporters will contribute and WSJ.com editors will also aggregate content from around the Web and display it on the Tech page.


WSJ.com Relaunches Technology Section With New Columns and Blogs

NEW YORK, Dec. 22, 2008 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — The Wall Street Journal Online today announced the revamp of its Technology section (http://wsj.com/technology), highlighted by the Journal’s in-depth technology coverage and showcasing several new columns and blogs. WSJ.com Technology includes three key areas of focus — Technology, Digits and Personal Technology — and features contributions from Wall Street Journal, MarketWatch, Dow Jones Newswires and All Things Digital (AllThingsD.com) reporters.

The Technology area features a new Digits blog that covers all aspects of technology, from product launches to major industry developments with contributions from the Journal’s 25 technology reporters and Dow Jones Newswires reporters from around the world. The Technology page will also include a new feature aggregating the top technology headlines from around the Web, which will be curated by WSJ.com editors.

Walt Mossberg’s Personal Technology column is the centerpiece of a new section called Personal Technology, which will also feature contributions from Mossberg Solution columnist Katherine Boehret. New Personal Technology features will include a column, The Decoder, by senior technology editor Julia Angwin, which helps users navigate the pitfalls of Web services, such as social networking sites and search engines, and Gadget Girl, video and column reviews led by the Journal’s Stacey Delo that offer a pragmatic approach to gadgets, focusing on usability with an occasional look at how they stack up to the real life-tests such as the ‘purse test,’ ‘fingernail test,’ and ‘toddler test.’ Digits, The Decoder and Gadget Girl are available for free to all users.

“Our users crave the latest information on technology trends and happenings, and this revamped section will give them numerous perspectives on myriad topics from product reviews to helpful advice to feedback straight from industry thought leaders,” said Almar Latour, managing editor of WSJ.com. “The Journal’s technology coverage has always been a leading resource for users, and we look forward to expanding upon this for their benefit.”

Additional new Technology features include:

  • Industry Spotlight: Provides a snapshot of the technology industry, written by Journal technology reporters
  • Q&A: Regular sessions with leading technology figures such as Steve Ballmer and Barry Diller
  • Quick Takes: Short articles describing new products and their position in the marketplace, written by Journal and MarketWatch reporters;
  • Andy Jordan’s Tech Diary: Quirky videos investigating how humans interact with technology.

    In addition to the enhanced Technology section, WSJ.com has launched several new features since the site’s redesign in September, including a new Management 2.0 blog with expert Gary Hamel, with more to follow in the coming months. The WSJ.com Technology section can be found at
    http://wsj.com/technology.