VOTE: Should People Serve Lawsuits Over Facebook?

Courts in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the U.K. have begun to allow litigants to serve suits via Facebook. Do you think this practice is fair?

Apparently, courts in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the U.K. have begun to allow lawsuits to proceed even when a would-be defendant can’t be given the suit in person, and these countries’ legal systems have just begun to allow litigants to serve suits via Facebook.

At least in the U.S., notifications of lawsuits literally require a human to witness someone actually receiving the hard copy of the suit.

People wanting to dodge litigation can and do try to make themselves — and their families — scare they can pretend they’re not getting sued.

Facebook could change this whole game if courts continue to allow the social network to become a medium for serving suit. Now it’s one thing for Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the U.K. to allow this practice to happen on the social network, and another thing entirely if the world’s most litigious nation, the U.S. does so as well.

So far, a U.S. court has ruled that creditors may not track down debtors via Facebook. But that doesn’t necessarily translate into a legal precedent for serving notice of a lawsuit.

We’re curious to know what you think about this issue. Do you think it’s fair to allow people to serve lawsuits via Facebook?

Please share your opinion by participating in the informal poll below, and be sure to include your rationale in the comments section. And check back later to see how others are voting.