REPORT: 11% of U.K Facebook Users Share Accounts with Their Partners

How does Facebook’s real-name policy apply to joint accounts shared by both members of couples? According to a recent survey of 2,387 U.K. Internet users 18 and older by Voucher Codes Pro, 11 percent of respondents shared joint Facebook accounts with their partners.

CoupleUsingTablet650How does Facebook’s real-name policy apply to joint accounts shared by both members of couples? According to a recent survey of 2,387 U.K. Internet users 18 and older by Voucher Codes Pro, 11 percent of respondents shared joint Facebook accounts with their partners.

Why? The top reasons, according to Voucher Codes Pro, were:

  • Lack of trust in the relationship (32 percent).
  • Same circle of friends means we don’t require separate accounts (26 percent).
  • To share pictures (21 percent).
  • Only use it to keep in touch with our family (13 percent).
  • Don’t use it enough to warrant two separate profiles (11 percent).

Voucher Codes Pro also found that:

  • 4 percent of respondents who shared joint Facebook accounts also had separate accounts that their partners were unaware of.
  • Joint accounts were suggested by women 82 percent of the time and by men just 18 percent of the time.
  • The two most common age groups to have joint accounts were 25 through 30 (39 percent) and 50 and over (33 percent).

Voucher Codes Pro CEO Nick Swan said in a release announcing the results:

Joint Facebook accounts seem like a good idea if you’re perhaps an older couple who only uses Facebook to check in with the grandkids or keep in touch with family, but I think they spell trouble for young couples. If you don’t trust your partner enough to let them have their own Facebook account, there are obviously issues in the relationship that need solving.

Readers: Do you know anyone who is part of a joint Facebook account?

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