These Stats Show Why Global Marketers Must Shift Focus Even More to Smartphones

The online world is on the go

International brands should take notice.
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If you are a global marketer, the biggest opportunity afoot may be on smartphones, according to new research from Adobe that is being released today in conjunction with Mobile World Congress. By next year, iPhones, Androids, and other smartphones will be responsible for the following amount of online traffic in each country:

  • Brazil — 37 percent (up 6 percent year over year)
  • China — 37 percent (up 6 percent year over year)
  • India — 46 percent (up 6 percent year over year)
  • Malaysia — 41 percent (up 6 percent year over year)
  • New Zealand — 41 percent (up 5 percent year over year)

If marketers’ efforts are not on par with such growth, said Adobe Digital Insights senior managing analyst Becky Tasker, “They really need to come up with a plan …or they are going to be left in the dust.”

Tasker’s team analyzed 1.7 trillion visits around the world to more than 16,000 websites for three years in a period ending in January 2017.

Other key findings include:

  • Even though tablets were heavily discounted in recent holiday seasons, which one might expect to lead to a spike in their usage, the devices’ share of web traffic continues to dip. It has fallen from 10 percent of all traffic in 2014 to 9 percent in 2015 and to 8 percent last year.
  • Google’s one-year-old mobile publishing platform called AMP is working increasingly well for large U.S. publishers. In April 2016, AMP accounted for roughly 2 percent of all site traffic, and this share grew steadily to reach 7 percent in December.
  • The U.S. is no longer bringing new users to the internet. Growth has flatlined around 0 percent, Tasker explained, stating, “Nearly all the people who will be using the internet are already using the internet.”
  • Smartphone users have jumped 69 percent since 2014, but desktop and tablet usage is down 23 percent and 19 percent, respectively.
  • Mobile app installs decreased by 38 percent since December 2014, while app launches are down 28 percent.