The New Face of the Fake News

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We’d been looking around, although probably not as thoroughly as we could, for who had been responsible for the re-design of The Onion’s site some time ago (we returned to the search, prompted by with the re-designed print edition, which, as of last week, has a nice new look as well, and we’re pretty sure was done in-house, unless someone can tell us otherwise). Well, we learned, thanks to this rehashed bit of PR on Design Interact, that it was the firm Behavior (and Khoi Vinh, during his time with them, who we have to thank for it. Here’s some about the process:

Instead of simply re-working the page layout, Behavior redesigned the digital version of The Onion from scratch as if they were launching a real newspaper. This meant cataloging all of The Onion’s past, present, and future content needs, understanding and defining their business objectives and then redesigning the user interface for a more dynamic and content-rich experience. The core of this challenge was reorganizing hundreds of archived articles into an intuitive, highly scalable navigational hierarchy that would keep millions of digital readers happy in any number of formats, from cell phone to iPod.

UPDATE: You know when you have that sense of dread, that you’re doing the wrong thing as you do it? That happened with this post, and we were lucky to have only sustained several hours of incorrectness before it was resolved. Our man Khoi Vinh, he of the mighty Subtraction, wrote in to tell us that the redesign of the site happened a year ago, and that he was actually at the helm. And while we remembered that way back in the back of our heads, we came to our conclusion because of these weird coincidences: a) we saw the above-linked press release on a site, just posted up this weekend and b) we never much read The Onion online anymore, for it is available in abundance at nearly every coffee shop in print, so while we looked at the site, and found it similar, we went back to “a)” the recently linked, reformated press release. Apologies for this blunder. How’s about we call it an “Onion-esque” satirical take on journalism or something, and claim we were just doing this for laughs? Only, yeah, okay, ours wasn’t at all funny.