The Digg Chronicle: Digg Content in Newspaper Form

Digg is getting into the virtual newspaper business, announcing the launch of The Digg Chronicle, along with a revised Top News -- Trending feature, and improved viewing of photos and videos.

Digg is getting into the virtual newspaper business, announcing the launch of The Digg Chronicle, along with a revised Top News — Trending feature, and improved viewing of photos and videos.

The Digg Chronicle presents content from Digg in newspaper form, and it is available in daily, weekly, and monthly editions.

Unlike Most Recent, which displays content based on when it is posted, Top News — Trending ranks it by how active Digging and commenting has been, with the items with greater engagement moving closer to the top.

And Digg is refining the way it displays images and video, using technology including the Facebook Open Graph protocol in the process.

More from software engineer Will Larson in a post on the Digg Blog:

Every once in a while, someone working at Digg has an interesting idea and wants to work on it, just because. Chronicle was born out of one of those “just because” moments. We wondered how Digg would look if it resembled a real newspaper. It turns out, even a simple version looks pretty cool, and we wanted to get your opinions.

Most Recent is a river of news with the best content entering at the top and new content pushing it down over time. Trending is an entirely different beast, where we rank stories by the how actively users are Digging and commenting on the stories, and great content floats up to the top as it gets more engagement.

As many loyal Diggers have noticed, we’ve been working at bringing more content onto Digg. Many sites label their content using oEmbed, which allowing us to include life-changing videos like 11,000 Lanterns Floating Over Poland from Break.com, as well as thoughtful videos like Altered Focus Burma from less mainstream sites like MPORA directly on Digg.

We are also making some of that embedded content available to you right from the story lists. Whenever you see a thumbnail with a big Play button on top, click it and your video will appear right there, without you having to leave the page. This way, you can enjoy more of your favorite content faster and easier than ever.

In addition to bringing video content onto Digg, last week we also started bringing images onto Digg, as well, like I wanna be on you and The World According to an Alcoholic. For now, images will only be available from the story pages, not on the story lists.

We’re discovering these images using the Facebook Open Graph protocol, which allows website owners to specify metadata, including which image on the page to use for rendering purposes. (We use these not only for embedding images, but also for picking the best thumbnails for stories.)