Taking Out The Trash, 08.17.06

  • Seattle-based film critic N.P. Thompson “slams” Slate for being rejected for publication. FishbowlNY has the full story, complete with salacious email.

  • To “dumpster next to my house” tipster: Send us pictures/locations.

  • NPR announced that Mandalit del Barco will receive the “2006 Association of Hispanic Journalists (NAHJ) radio journalism award for her reporting on Hurricane Katrina and Central American gangs.” According to the release, Del Barco will be given her award at NAHJ’s 21st “Noche de Triunfos” Journalism Awards Gala on October 5 at the Capital Hilton. She also won the award in 2002 and 2004.

  • James Manning McKay, owner and founder of McKay supermarkets, and father of state Senate candidate Thomas F. “Tommy” McKay, “is launching a weekly newspaper within the next month or so.” The community newspaper for St. Mary’s County will be called County Times. McKay told the Maryland Gazette that “his decision to publish a newspaper now has nothing to do with his son’s political career.”

  • Jake Tapper examines the role that journalists and authorities played in shaping public opinion over JonBenet Ramsey’s death. Tapper: “I hope the media and authorities are looking long and hard at their own shameful behavior in this whole affair. Of course, I doubt that anyone is… but it’s very important for all of us to remember lessons learned here for future reference.”

  • DCRTV reports that Channel 9 and union workers reached a “tentative agreement.” From DCRTV: “The company (9’s owner Gannett) and (the) union have reached a tentative agreement on a new contract. The (current) contract has been extended until next week, when a ratification vote has been scheduled for Tuesday.”

  • What do journalists drink (which, in turn, makes them leak)? Alan Smith wants to know.

  • Time announced it will shift its publishing schedule from Monday to Friday, with a mid-week close as of January 2007. Mediaweek reports that this move is a return to its original schedule established by founding editor Henry Luce. It will also “enable a more seamless flow of news between the print edition and its companion Web site.”

  • Jon Stewart turns CNN’s “Target: USA” into “Target: CNN.” Eat The Press has the hilarious details.

  • According to Nielsen Media Research data, “Meet the Press” was the top-rated Sunday morning public affairs program, winning on in all categories last Sunday. According to an NBC release, the show attracted 3.400 million total viewers, 45% more than CBS “Face the Nation’s” 2.351 million, a 65% lead over ABC “This Week’s” 2.055 million, and a 163% advantage over FOX “News Sunday’s” 1.291 million.

  • Elizabeth Vargas is a mom again. According to AP, Vargas and the baby Samuel Wyatt are “doing incredible,” said ABC representative Alyssa Apple. TVNewser recaps.

  • Variety has a shocking announcement for traditional media: “Sorry to break the news, but they’re not laughing with you, they’re laughing at you. … NewsLab exec director Deborah Potter notes in this month’s American Journalism Review how Web sites like YouTube circulate TV’s gaffes and bloopers in record time, but such mistakes often draw fewer guffaws than the inane antics newscasts pull intentionally.” Here’s looking at you Geraldo.

  • A LA Time/Bloomberg poll shows that kids don’t look to “weird” sources for news after all. Media Life Magazine reports, “It turns out that teens and young adults are very much like adults in how and where they get their news, and much of it comes from that most humdrum of sources, local TV.” Sorry Colbert.

  • The new blog of former Wonketteer David Lat has officially been named.

  • The WaPo reports that Fairfax local access Channel 16 won an award for excellence from the Alliance for Community Media this month. Programming includes “Jury Duty,” “Senior Times,” “Tax Relief Made Simple” and “Tax Evaders,” which outs local residents and business owners for owing back taxes.

  • Eric Umansky is leaving Slate for a fellowship at Columbia. Umansky tells Romenesko that for his replacement, “Slate is having a bake-off. Alexander Barnes Dryer — currently at the New Yorker’s D.C. office — will compete with two freelancers, Daniel Politi, and Joshua Kucera.”

  • New York Times Co. and Tribune Co. reported “declines in July newspaper advertising revenue, amid ongoing weakness across a number of ad categories.” NYT overall revenue slipped by 1.8% while ad revenue dropped 3.3% in July compared with the same month a year ago. At the New York Times Media Group, “which includes the flagship” newspaper, ad revenue was down 4.6%. Tribune TRB said overall revenue declined 1.4% and publishing advertising revenue declined 1.4%.

  • Mark Glaser gives a run-down of “the ever-changing media.”

  • “Off The Record” reports that “an independent filmmaker is on the verge of optioning the film rights to Times staff writer Jennifer 8. Lee’s April 2005 article ‘The Man Date,’ according to a source close to the negotiations.” Under Newspaper Guild rules, The Times and Lee would split all profits evenly. Romenesko has the press release.

  • “Interview-shy” Jim Romenesko sat down for a recorded chat with a student at Northwestern University and Idea Grove found the file.

  • TVNewser reports no contest on who broke the JonBenet Ramsey story first.

  • FishbowlNY has a roundup of the most worn-out cliches utilized by the press, courtesy of Factiva. It seems “time after time” journos return to these cliches “at the end of the day.”

  • TVNewser, keeping us updated on the kidnapped FNCers, reports that when Greta Van Susteren asked Shep Smith for a status report, he responded: “[T]here are indications of some kind that this may in fact resolve itself. And we have been led to believe now that Steve Centanni and Olaf Wiig have not been harmed in any way. It’s our hope that we’ll all be seeing them again very soon, Greta.”

  • Fox News broke its silence last night after the State Dept. demanded the FNCers’ immediate release.

  • ABCNews.com: “The two Fox journalists recently kidnapped in Gaza are just the latest in a growing campaign targeting journalists, according to the International News Safety Institute.” 41 journos have been kidnapped since 2001.