Rovio’s revenues double in 2012 to €152.2 million

Rovio Angry Birds asset

Rovio Angry Birds assetRovio today revealed its financial results for 2012, reporting revenues of €152.2 million ($195.5 million), a twofold increase from revenues in 2011 of €75.6 million ($97.1 million).

Profits were also up year-over-year from €35.4 million ($45.5 million) in 2011 to €55.5 million ($71.3 million) in 2012. Rovio also doubled the size of its company during 2012, from 224 employees to 518.

Rovio launched four games in 2012 — Angry Birds Space, Amazing Alex, Bad Piggies and Angry Birds Star Wars. The games helped Rovio surpass the one billion download mark by May 2012, and the total number of monthly active users across all platforms to 263 million in December 2012. In total, Rovio’s total number of game downloads has exceeded 1.7 billion. Rovio says its main revenue channels were paid games, virtual goods and advertising. Lastly, Rovio’s Consumer Products business unit, which creates the Angry Birds-branded merchandise such as toys, plushes and board games, accounted for 45 percent of the company’s revenue in 2012, up from 30 percent in 2011.

Recently, Rovio launched Angry Birds Toons, its cartoon series based off the company’s hit franchise, and The Croods, its most recent game based off DreamWorks’ animated feature but does’t have any Angry Birds affiliation.

The Espoo, Finland-headquartered company says the future of its business in 2013 will depend on successful new game launches, keeping fans engaged with its content and the success of new initiatives.

“We have had a stellar start for this year,” said Rovio CEO Mikael Hed, in a statement. “In addition to our successful games portfolio we recently launched our first Angry Birds Toons series through third party partners and our own in-game distribution channel. We will continue to strengthen our position in the entertainment business through continuing to innovate on our existing brands, exploring creating new IP as well as exploring opportunities with external parties.”