NY Press Sex Columnist Quits After Just One Column

0124lonow.jpgNew York Press sex columnist Claudia Lonow resigned from her job one day after her first column was released. Moe Tkacik of Jezebel caught the journalist directly plagarizing from fellow sex columnist Dan Savage.

In a statement issued by the New York Press, editor David Blum says that Lonow was “unaware that using questions from Savage’s column was a breach of journalistic ethics.”

Read that again: She was “unaware that using questions from Savage’s column was a breach of journalistic ethics.” Uhm, no kidding?

Now, we wanted some expert commentary on this… So we turned to the New York Press‘ most well-known advice columnist, Judy McGuire (“Dategirl”). Here’s what she had to say:

My first thought was that someone had simply written both columnists (that’s been known to happen), but then I saw that Savage’s column was from 2006 and her column just started this week. Oops!

With so many advice columns out there (mine still runs in the Seattle Weekly!), I’d say it’s pretty dumb to plagiarize the most widely read sex columnist in the country. Also, since this broad is probably on her way out the door, I’d like to suggest that the Press run an excerpt of my new book, How Not to Date, as their cover story next week. I guarantee it’s 100% all me.

Well Judy, you were right — she is out the door.

(Image via Nerve)

David Blum’s full statement follows.


It has come to our attention that some of the questions in this week’s debut of the New York Press’s new sex-advice column, “Lip Service,” were taken from past columns by Dan Savage, the nationally-syndicated sex-advice columnist and editor of The Stranger. The author of the column, Claudia Lonow, a television writer based in Los Angeles who had not previously written for a newspaper, used the questions to provide material for her inaugural column, in the absence of real questions from readers. It had been our understanding that the questions for her first column came from friends. She has told us she was unaware that using questions from Savage’s column was a breach of journalism ethics. She has offered her resignation, and we’ve accepted it. We apologize to our readers, and to Dan Savage, for this error in judgment.