New Service Lets You Backup Your Facebook Pages

Backupify has declared today that it has launched the first online archival of Facebook fan pages by an independent third party.

BackupifyInternet-based storage and backup have been around for almost a decade, and subsequent innovations in this category continue to take the form of niche solutions. Case in point: Backupify has declared today that it has launched the first online archival of Facebook fan pages by an independent third party.

Here’s how Backupify describes the beta release on its own blog:

Now, for the first time ever, our users will be able to backup the complete contents of their Facebook fan page accounts. In addition, users of our Backupify for Facebook service can still backup, archive and export all news feeds, wall posts, photo albums and messages that are associated with their individual Facebook profiles. Backupify now provides users with the most comprehensive and effective Facebook backup solution on the market.

This service is currently in beta while we continue to develop additional features and comply to user requirements. Our VP of Product Development, Benjamin Thomas, explains, “Our initial release of Facebook Profile and Fanpage backup is focused on building a solid foundation for backing up all data available through the Facebook Graph API. Future releases will include the ability to search, sort, and export data in a variety of formats.”

If anyone ever doubted the need for archiving specifically focused on social networking, recent announcements have surely made the case for backing up Facebook page contents. If people are admitting they hack into loved ones’ accounts to survey takers (funded by BitDefender), the real scope of hacking may be far greater than the official statistics show — I’ve read that people subconsciously try to impress surveyors and responses can get skewed because of this.

Adding fan pages to the social networking content that Backupify can back up ought to drive the company’s numbers up considerably — the company currently boasts that it is backing up more than 120 million emails, 78 million tweets and 41 million pictures. With those kind of numbers, I’m curious to know when and where the archiving product will have fees or advertising revenues attached. So far, I have yet to see any indication of how the company plans to get a revenue stream going, beyond just collecting venture funding like the recent so-called Series A announced earlier this fall.