Huge Numbers Of People Hack Into Loved Ones' Accounts

If this survey is anything to go by, web users are a sneaky and mistrustful lot when it comes to the significant others in their lives.

If this survey is anything to go by, web users are a sneaky and mistrustful lot when it comes to the significant others in their lives.

Anti-virus software maker BitDefender surveyed 1500 people and asked respondents whether they had ever tried to hack into somebody else’s social network account by illicitly retrieving the respective person’s password.

The survey suggested that nearly nine out of 10 web users (89% of respondents) had searched for a password hacking method on the internet. Only 11% said they were not interested in this type of tool. Of the people who had searched for the software, 98% had gone on to install it and try to use it.

While we’ve reported previously that large numbers of parents spy on their children on social networks, it seems that romantic partners are even more prone to do so. BitDefender found that 72% of respondents stated that they had wanted to read their girlfriend/boyfriend/wife/husband’s personal messages and 64% had thought about changing the information in and password to their ex-boyfriend/ex-girlfriend’s social network account. Meanwhile, just 23% were parents who wanted to read their children’s messages and 14% were trying to spy on their parents.

I have to say, I’m pretty astonished at the results. I couldn’t believe it at first and had to ask BitDefender for additional information on its survey methodology. It appears to be legit. There were 1,500 respondents chosen at random over the course of a week. The respondents came from 21 countries. Ages ranged from 15 to 57 years with a mean of 30.3 years, and an equal number of men and women.

People, people, people. Give your loved ones some privacy and trust. And lay off the password-hacking programs – they’re full of malware.