How the Biggest Voices in Sports are Interconnected Via Twitter [Interactive Infographic]

The company recognizes about 4,000 identities, each with at least 1,500 followers. It started with a handful of major sports voices and identified accounts connected to them. The company then filtered those results and repeated the process until the Pro Sports Twitterverse became clear as an interactive infographic.

Chartball designed an interactive infographic that identifies the top sports tweeters in the sports universe — Pro Sports Twitterverse.

The company recognizes about 4,000 identities, each with at least 1,500 followers. It started with a handful of major sports voices and identified accounts connected to them. The company then filtered those results and repeated the process until the Pro Sports Twitterverse became clear as an interactive infographic.

You can reach the infographic by going directly to Chartball’s website. Chartball is a sports poster production company.

The infographic is pretty unique and fun all around. This presentation is a hint of what’s to come in the future, and I am all for it. Consider Pro Sports Twitterverse a work in process because Chartball is calling this one their first draft and they plan to create another draft by the end of the year.

You simply click on a circle to see which users are following a given tweeter. The larger the circle the more influence that tweeter possesses — followers within the group, regularity of status updates and followers in general.

Chartball’s charting of the circles is affected by the considerable differences between the impact of pro-sports athletes and the individuals doing the most commenting. For the most part, athletes just follow athletes. Reporters follow athletes, and they follow one another. The two galaxies don’t really engage with each other much. It is very unusually for a pro athlete to follow more than a couple of sports reporters. Of course, sport reporters or sport news websites would follow pro athletes and one another as well.

Chartball explains, “Position of each circle is calculated with a program called Cytoscape which pulls the connected users toward one another and pushes them apart if they are not connected. The resulting picture groups communities together.”