Google Misses Facebook Platform Ads Deadline

If you were using Google Adsense to generate revenue within your Facebook application, you no longer can. The new preferred advertiser list went into effect yesterday and Google didn't make the list.

Facebook vs Google FightIf you were using Google Adsense to generate revenue within your Facebook application, you no longer can according to the social network’s official policy. The new preferred advertiser list went into effect yesterday and Google isn’t on it.

It appears that Facebook and Google can’t play together anytime soon. For consumers, this is a big blow in how they managing their identities and for developers its a huge loss as Google Adsense served as a significant source of revenue for many (see the developer forum threads here and here).

Facebook provided the following statement:

“This is the current list of ad providers that have signed our terms that govern ad quality and data use, although more are being added every day. We currently have more than sixty of the largest and smallest providers on the list. This is a public and open agreement and new providers can sign at any time.”

While it seemed possible that Facebook would ban Google as of a couple weeks ago, Facebook stated at the time, “We are continuing to work with various ad providers and will add them to the list as they sign the terms,”suggesting that there’s a possibility that Google would be added. Since then there has been no change in the company’s stance, but many developers are concerned as their applications now are forced to use some of the original Facebook ad networks.

Ultimately the alternatives may not be horrendous, but none have the brand cachet that Google does. While it could theoretically be added to the list in the future, developers now have to choose between using preferred ad networks or risk being blocked from the platform. We don’t currently have any reports of developers being shut down for running Google ads, and from the sounds of things, Facebook probably won’t take any actions against those who do run AdSense, as the service has not explicitly been banned (although it has been, according to Facebook’s ad platform terms).

While developers can still choose to run Google Adsense on Facebook connect-powered websites, all canvas applications technically aren’t supposed to do so. All Google needs to do to get back on the platform is sign off on the terms you can see by clicking on this link. Apparently Google hasn’t felt hard pressed to sign them and as a result remains excluded from the official list of ad providers until further notice.