Friendster Will Delete User Files by the End of May

In the present, it appears Friendster is changing its format and foregoing the idea of sharing with friends. In a message to registered members, the company is asking all users to install a custom application to export all their profile data, as most of it will be definitely deleted on May 31, 2011. So, mark your calendars with a big red circle, so you don’t lose your profile data.

You may find it hard to believe that there was a social networking platform before MySpace and Facebook. It’s called Friendster, a pioneering social networking website for consumers. In 2002, it was launched and attracted tens of millions of users over the years. However, the platform with the catchy name never grew to become the online social network it should have been.

In the present, it appears Friendster is changing its format and foregoing the idea of sharing with friends. In a message to registered members, the company is asking all users to install a custom application to export all their profile data, as most of it will be definitely deleted on May 31, 2011. So, mark your calendars with a big red circle, so you don’t lose your profile data.

An app is available called Friendster Exporter. The app will download or export their profile data: friends list, photos, messages, comments, testimonials, shoutouts, blogs and groups. You have your options of porting content to Flickr or Multiply.

By no means is the company going under. It intends to keep all accounts alive, along with user friends lists, games details and basic profile information. Friendster says it is reinventing itself as a service focused on “entertainment and fun” for those who want to play games and music. It does sound familiar when Myspace started feeling the Facebook heat for real. The new Friendster should be going live in the coming weeks and focus mainly on Asian users according to TechCrunch.

You might sense the need to think that another good social network platform must come to an end. If only Friendster had become great like Facebook, we would be seeing Facebook come to and end. Which strikes a question: How many surviving social networking platforms can we have on the Internet?