First Impressions Of Pew’s State Of The News Media Report

3988939596_047a0e764e_m.jpg Good morning readers—as you might have read Friday, your usual blogger is off geeking it up in Austin this week, and I’ll be slinging links in her absence. Great to be with you, and I hope I can trust you to stick to this “no hazing” promise Rachel invoked.

I always like to start a bleary Monday with some light and uplifting reading, so it’s a good thing the Pew Project for Excellence in Journalism just released its State of the News Media 2010 report. Perhaps we can ease ourselves into it with some Cliff’s Notes courtesy of Editor & Publisher. One finding in the report: Newsrooms at newspapers shrunk by 27 percent over the past three years, shedding 15,000 full-time reporting and editing jobs.

“For newspapers, which still provide the largest share of reportorial journalism in the United Sates, the metaphor that comes to mind is sand in an hourglass,” the report says. Of course, a major issue is that the industry has yet to determine a foolproof way to reap significant profits from online news consumers, a problem the study also sheds light on. Only a small fraction of respondents to Pew’s survey said they would keep visiting their favorite news sites if they had to clear pay walls to get in. Furthermore, most surveyed also said that they never click on online ads.

PaidContent.org chips in with other observations on the study, and you can check out the full report at Pew’s site. Let us know what other findings surprise or unsettle you.

photo: Tijs Zwinkels