Facebook’s Chief European Creative Says Video Is Still Undervalued

Though 100 million hours are viewed on the platform every day

Courtesy: IAB

BARCELONA, Spain—The head of Facebook’s European creative shop said video is still undervalued, despite how much the social network, brands and agencies have focused on it over the past couple of years.

Speaking Tuesday at Mobile World Congress during an event hosted by the Interactive Advertising Bureau, Rob Newlan, regional director of Facebook’s Creative Shop for Europe, the Middle East and Africa, said, “We have this astonishing moment right now of what great creative brands look like. How do you build great businesses? How do you create value for people and for brands? And how do you do this in this brave new world?”

Newlan said video has rapidly increased over the past few years. He gave the example of how massively video has been adopted: While 5 billion total gigabytes of video were created through 2003, 5 billion gigabytes are now created every 10 seconds.

According to one study conducted by Facebook, 75 percent of mobile data will be video-based by 2020.

Over the past couple of years, Facebook has increasingly been pushing the use of video within users’ news feeds. In January, Facebook updated how it prioritizes video, placing more focus on longer form content and less on other media companies and brands.

Newlan said 100 million hours of video are watched on Facebook every day.

According to one study conducted by Facebook, 75 percent of mobile data will be video-based by 2020. Newlan said the ad industry needs to take a clue from entrepreneurs such as Elon Musk, who posted a video on Facebook of a failed rocket landing last year.

Newlan described an outline for how agencies might approach a video story: Get the good stuff, treat the first scene like an overture, find the most impactful footage and lead with it, push the climax to “a place beyond words,” and end early.

So how do agency groups and brands start creating better content? Newlan said the industry still needs to bring in more diverse talent, explaining that the current make-up of groups is still “just not good enough.”

“We’re not yet there where we need to be to have the talent in place to understand the people that we’re talking too,” he said. “It’s a very basic need, the more that we have great diverse talent in place the more perspectives we can have.”