Facebook Is Going After Revenge Porn

The social network introduced tools for users whose intimate images are shared without permission

Facebook announced Wednesday that it is taking steps to curb the sharing of revenge porn, or intimate images that are shared without users’ permission.

Head of global safety Antigone Davis said in a Newsroom post that a study by the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative found that 93 percent of victims of revenge porn reported “significant emotional distress” and 82 percent reported “significant impairment in social, occupational or other important areas of their life.”

She detailed how Facebook’s new tools work:

If you see an intimate image on Facebook that looks like it was shared without permission, you can report it by using the “Report” link that appears when you tap on the downward arrow or “…” next to a post.

Specially trained representatives from our community operations team review the image and remove it if it violates our community standards. In most cases, we will also disable the account for sharing intimate images without permission. We offer an appeals process if someone believes an image was taken down in error.

We then use photo-matching technologies to help thwart further attempts to share the image on Facebook, Messenger and Instagram (the reporting flow on Instagram is pictured below). If someone tries to share the image after it’s been reported and removed, we will alert them that it violates our policies and that we have stopped their attempt to share it.

Davis also outlined the social network’s efforts with other organizations:

  • Facebook worked with the CCRI and other companies to create a guide to removing such content from several social networks and internet destinations, as well as a Facebook-specific guide (embedded below).
  • Feedback throughout the process was provided by the National Network to End Domestic Violence, the Center for Social Research, the Revenge Porn Helpline (U.K.) and the CCRI.
  • Facebook met with more than 150 safety organizations and experts throughout 2016 in several locations— Kenya; India; Ireland; Washington, D.C.; New York; Spain; Turkey; Sweden; and the Netherlands—to gather feedback on ways it could improve the process.

Facebook Not Without My Consent by David Cohen on Scribd

Image courtesy of SIphotography/iStock.