Facebook Refers More Traffic, Not Google's Loss

Facebook is referring an increasing amount of web traffic to different sites, but you can't call much of the social network's gain Google's loss.

Facebook is referring an increasing amount of web traffic to different sites, but you can’t call much of the social network’s gain Google’s loss.

We asked Citigroup for a copy of analyst Mark Mahaney’s report that Peter Kafka refers to in a blog post today, but in the mean time will give you our spin on the analyses. x

Google still ranks as the top source of traffic for 74 percent of websites surveyed by Mahaney. Google’s share of referrals actually increased for 69 percent of the sites surveyed by Mahaney.

However, the search giant seems to be losing share among media sites in particular, and health sites to a lesser extent. However, Mahaney only sees a correlation between Google’s loss and Facebook’s gain among the Glam Media Network of blogs: Google’s share fell from 17 percent to 13 percent, and Facebook’s rose from 5 percent to 9 percent.

Now, Glam hasn’t changed any of its policies to reflect this difference in traffic referrals, but we know of one media site that has made such a switch: The New York Times. And when you look at the tables reproduced below, you could see how it would really be pushing things to state that Facebook referrals to the NYT have risen at the expense of Google — we don’s see enough change in the numbers to make that claim.

Meanwhile, readers, what do you think of the data from Citigroup?