Facebook Page Admins Protest Wall Post Organization

Every time Facebook redesigns a layout, some people get upset, and one such a reaction to the new pages format has led to the creation of what else but a page. This one asks the social network to reinstate chronological order to wall posts.

Every time Facebook redesigns a layout, some people get upset, and one such a reaction to the new pages format has led to the creation of what else but a page; this one asks the social network to reinstate chronological order to wall posts.

Facebook’s official communications team called the redesign of pages a standardization, to make their design resemble or parallel that of profiles. So the well-intentioned Bring Back Chronological Posts On Pages protest page is an admin community version of how some users had reacted to the news feed filters. Both have resulted from insufficient communication about new features on Facebook, leaving users of the site to try to explain the changes for one another.

We first heard about Bring Back Chronological Posts On Pages via an email from a reader. As of this writing, said page has 6,779 fans as of this writing, and they seem rather passionate about their complaint. In fact, a couple of them told us they believe the content on our page doesn’t show up chronologically.

These folks lament that when you click on “posts by everyone” on a page’s wall post — not while you’re administering your own page, but rather looking at someone else’s — Facebook defaults to putting the posts by the page administrator in chronological order, and then clustering the responses underneath the respective postings by the admin. So there’s no absolute chronological order to everything but rather a hybrid: responses to the same post show up in chronological order relative only to the same original posting.

The “posts by everyone” tab also pushes the most popular clusters to the top of the wall, something with an impact level inversely proportionate to how consistently fans react to all of an admin’s wall postings.

It seems that a simple solution to the chronology predicament would involve adding another tab or two to the options at the top of the wall. One tab could enable you to see all posts to the wall in absolute chronological order, which would lose some of the clustering or threading; a second additional tab could show you posts since you last looked at the page, perhaps automatically opening a new tab in one’s browser to do that. Perhaps Facebook could make these changes in time for the planned deadline to make the new page layout mandatory rather than just optional like it is now?

Readers, what do you think about the wall posts appear on redesigned pages?

Many thanks to Julie Lesser for the tip.