Facebook IQ: Keep Your Eyes on the Calabaza

The West Indian pumpkin was one of February’s Topics to Watch

Calabaza soup, anyone?

Facebook users were hungry for calabaza in February, as conversation volume about the West Indian pumpkin—as well as related terms cheese, chicken, empanada, flor, flowers, ham, onion, quesadilla, vegetables and Verdura—was up 7.5 times compared with February 2017 and 0.4 times month-over-month, making it one of Facebook IQ’s Topics to Watch for the month.

Women drove the calabaza talk, particularly those between 25 and 64.

Eucalyptus globulus saw conversation volume on Facebook up 31.5 times year-over-year and 0.7 times compared with January, along with related terms citrus, clove, Copaiba, essential oils, eucalyptus, eucalyptus radiata and eucalyptus staigeriana.

Conversation was dominated by women 34 through 49.

Glitch art—along with digital art, glitch and vaporwave—saw year-over-year growth of 5.1 times and a month-over-month bump of 0.5 times, with the 25-through-34 age group leading the way.

Hypoallergenic and related terms allergy, cats, dogs, makeup, nickel, paraben, skin, stainless steel, U.S. and Valentine’s Day saw conversation volume soar 83.4 times versus February 2017 and 0.5 times compared with January.

Women 25 through 49 drove the discussion.

Isochronic tones saw conversation volume up 19.1 times year-over-year and 0.4 times versus January, along with related terms beat (acoustics), brainwave entertainment and meditation. The 25-through-34 and 50-through-64 age groups drove the conversation.

Smartdust—as well as related terms artificial intelligence, DNA, Europe, metal, microwave, Morgellons, nanotechnology and nervous system—saw conversation volume spike 21.7 times year-over-year and 0.6 times month-over-month.

Men 50 and older were the primary discussion drivers.

We learned these things from Facebook IQ’s latest data chart called Topics to Watch, which is designed to help marketers know what subjects to look out for on the social network. The topics are based on trending data, and Adweek readers get an exclusive look at them each month.