Facebook Campaign Helps Clean Up New Delhi Walls

A 78-year-old retired army colonel is using Facebook to get help stripping the walls of his New Delhi, India city of dirty posters that have mucked up its overall appearance.

A 78-year-old retired army colonel is using Facebook to get help stripping the walls of his New Delhi, India city of dirty posters that have mucked up its overall appearance.

Shivraj Kumar began his Facebook city clean up efforts back in August 2009 in order to have a more personal connection with the folks he’d plan on recruiting to help his cause.

The “Poster Hatao” campaign that Kumar began has garnered some 211 Facebook fans. Many young people have also responded to his committed cause which is to clean up his city’s walls of the eyesore conditions that have resulted in defaced public buildings and furniture. The posters are basically of political causes, ads or tutorials which have been either ripped or grafittied beyond recognition.

“People from all age groups are joining in to remove unwanted posters and make Delhi poster-free,” Kumar told Punjab Newsline.

Kumar and with his wife Laxmi, 73 ensure that a family member checks their Facebook page daily, in order to maintain a personal line of communication with their already established, or any potential clean up troops.

Thus far, the campaigners have only received praise for their hard work which is evident from the positive comments via the social networking site. Facebookers also use Kumar’s page to inform him about their own local conditions with regards to dirty wall poster problems.

Interestingly enough, as a result of the Delhi Prevention of Defacement of Property Act of 2007, which was enforced in March 2009, the putting up of posters, banners and wall-writings on public properties is a criminal offense punishable by a fine, one year jail term, or both. Yet there are some Delhi citizens who continue to turn a blind’s eye to the strict penalities regarding the defacing of public buildings.

Kumar told Punjab Newsline:

The interesting part is that we have a team of volunteers who are allotted a particular spot to monitor and clean. A warning is given to those defacing public property. If they don’t respond, we approach the authorities to fine them.

Despite those poster law breakers, Kumar thinks his campaign has been an overall success and has even helped to create a similar project in the most populated city of India, Mumbai.

Readers, how have you used Facebook to assist in your own personal campaigns?