Eyewitness Videos Hit YouTube After Moscow Airport Bombing

Within a matter of hours after the tragic suicide bombing in Moscow's Domodedovo Airport this afternoon, eyewitness footage was already going up on YouTube, proving yet again the power of citizen journalism.

Within a matter of hours after the tragic suicide bombing in Moscow’s Domodedovo Airport this afternoon, eyewitness footage was already going up on YouTube. One video in particular has been circulating, with coverage on Russia Today, CNN, and other news sources, and more YouTube videos are continuing to pop up. We’re likely to see more over the next few hours and days.

The video that is getting the most coverage thus far is amateur footage of the site just moments after the bombing, dust filling the air. The source of the video is not clear at this time. CNN sources YouTube.com/Russian.StateTv, which is not a correct YouTube URL, and Russia Today does not provide a source. The footage has been copied and uploaded by a huge number of different YouTube users.

More footage of the outside of the airport surfaced on YouTube a little bit later on in the day and Russia Today has been uploading extensive content to their YouTube page.

Regardless of who shot the original eyewitness footage, I think that the power of web video and citizen journalism is becoming clearer and clearer. When someone at the scene of an event or tragedy, such as the tragedy that occurred today in Moscow, all they have to do is whip out a cellular phone with a camera, shoot a quick video and upload it to YouTube and the world will be able to see what they have seen and what they are going through. Major events can get worldwide coverage within a matter of minutes, or the time it takes to upload the video to YouTube.

I try not to pay too much attention to the news because it brings me down. However, I like to know when something major happens, such as the Arizona shooting earlier this month or today’s terrorist attack in Moscow. And guess what? I found out about both these things, within hours after they happened, via YouTube and Twitter – not from CNN or any other official news source. I think we can safely say that citizen journalism and social media are the future of the news. What do you think?

On a personal note, my deepest condolences to anyone who was effected by today’s tragedy and the friends and family of the 35 dead and 152 wounded.