Excuse Me Officer…My App Begs to Differ

App users pulled over for driving over the speed limit can confirm in an instant that their rate of speed matches what the law enforcement officer reports. In some cases this may save the consumer hundreds of dollars in the event that the law enforcements method of capturing the rate of speed is flawed.

In New York, an officer discovers that the driver is driving without a seat belt fastened. But, he cannot pull over the driver because driving without a seat belt is a secondary offense. The officer decides to pull over the driver and gives driver a ticket for speeding and the unbuckled seat belt. Thankfully, driver is using My Max Speed on a regular basis and has logged his maximum speed at that time. Driver goes to court showing proof of driving under the legal limits and gets all charges dropped.

My Max Speed documents your rate of speed by geo-location every 5 seconds to accurately confirm your speed at the time of a citation or need for justice.

My Max Speed for smartphones has hit the streets. The app promotes a speed monitoring to encourage safe driving and protect consumer rights. With My Max Speed, users log their rates of speed every 5 seconds they are in travel. Among other uses, this information is valuable for drivers who want to review their driving speeds and confirm they are driving within the safe legal limits. The data is stored in a spreadsheet, compatible with Microsoft Excel, and is exportable in batches or in 5 minute data snapshots, covering a specific instance. Inside the spreadsheet display in the app, each speed recording can be tapped to display the exact physical location in a map format.

“There are hundreds of reasons to run My Max Speed on your smartphone. We expect many will help protect drivers’ rights while others will make the roads safer. For example, our children are more apt to drive slower and safer if they know there is a chance that I [you] will be checking their speed reports,” commented Wayne Irving, CEO

Additionally, app users pulled over for driving over the speed limit can confirm in an instant that their rate of speed matches what the law enforcement officer reports. In some cases this may save the consumer hundreds of dollars in the event that the law enforcements method of capturing the rate of speed is flawed.

In other cases, secondary offenses may be cited, where as the consumer may be pulled over for speeding and cited for something else. This includes but is not limited to infractions like; seat belts, proof of insurance and others. Having proof that speeding did not occur can impact other citations the driver may be exposed to.

With My Max Speed you can also tap on the spreadsheet sheet display in the app on any specific speed instance and get a daytime map. You can also send your speed reports to another through email and or share on Facebook.

When the app goes before the judge, I wonder how it will hold up in court. I also wonder if the app will contribute to slowing speeding drivers down. In 2009, speeding was a contributing factor in 30 percent of all fatal crashes, and 12,628 lives were lost in speeding-related crashes. The economic cost to society of speeding-related crashes is estimated by the NHTSA to be $28 billion per year. Speeding is a deliberate and calculated behavior where the driver knows the risk but ignores the danger. Fully 90 percent of all licensed drivers speed at some point in their driving career, and 75 percent admit to committing this offense regularly.