Environmental Documentary Film Debuting on Facebook

earth days movie posterEarth Days, a documentary film that showed at Sundance Festival 2009, will be getting its major public debut on Facebook, on April 11, 2010. Using a “social screening” application from Brand Networks, the Facebook airing will allow interaction with the film’s executive producer and director.

Topics about the environment stir up a hot bed of emotion and debate these days, and even inspire Facebook apps such as CO2 Neutral Profile. It’s this sort of interest that seemingly prompted the film Earth Days, which documents the origins and history of the American environmental movement, starting from the 1950s, to Rachel Carson’s important 1962 book ‘Silent Spring,’ to the first Earth Day in 1970, as well as modern eco-activism efforts. The film’s press kit says:

Earth Day’s secret weapon is a one-two punch of personal testimony and rare archival media. The extraordinary stories of the era’s pioneers – among them Former Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall; biologist/ Population Bomb author Paul Ehrlich; Whole Earth Catalog founder Stewart Brand; Apollo Nine astronaut Rusty Schweickart; and renewable energy pioneer Hunter Lovins – are beautifully illustrated with an incredible array of footage from candy-colored Eisenhower – era tableaux to classic tear-jerking 1970s anti-litterbug PSAs.

Executive Producer Mark Samels and Director Robert Stone will be interacting with Facebook viewers, who can pose questions just to film viewers or also to their Facebook news feed, thus letting their friends see. Brand Networks‘ solution allows for polling viewers and logging their comments.

The film has already had a 40-city theatrical run, and the Facebook screening is “an experiment” that hopes to find viewers who don’t typically watch PBS. After the April 11th Facebook screening, the 102 minute film will air on PBS stations on April 19th, just days before the 40th anniversary of Earth Day on April 22nd. The trailer can be seen at the Earth Days site.

[via Ecorazzi and LA Times]