The Economist Gives the Statue of Liberty a Makeover

Cover story celebrates Canada's relative openness to the huddled masses.

Periodically throughout the 2016 U.S. election season, a Twitter hashtag about Americans contemplating a move to Canada has trended. Another one in fact popped up this week.

Now, we can add to this trend the cover of the Oct. 29-Nov. 4 issue of The Economist. For their story “Liberty Moves North,” the magazine has added to the Statue of Liberty a maple leaf and hockey stick. As you might imagine, this Statue of Libert-eh is noteworthy news in Canada.

CBC News senior correspondent Neil Macdonald compares this week’s cover to a pair of previous Economist ones highlighting the Great White North, and summarizes the flattering POV:

This week’s edition praises Canada for its embrace of immigration, proportionately more than any other rich nation, and the Liberal government’s decision to welcome far more Syrian refugees than America, a nation that is far more responsible for creating Syrians’ misery.

It praises Canada for pursuing free trade, for maintaining a sound social safety net, for its sane gun laws, for its embrace of multiculturalism, for its willingness to suspend austerity when necessary and for its progressive, redistributive fiscal policies.

It even makes a great virtue of Canada’s gelid equanimity, its lack of spice and fire, quoting Dickens’ relief at finding in Canada, after an 1842 visit to America, “public feeling and private enterprise in a sound and wholesome state; nothing of flush or fever in its system.”

The Economist piece includes a sly dig at the Republican nominee’s core supporters. ‘Low-income men–Mr Trump’s base in America–are less likely to die prematurely in Canada, which suggests they are less beaten down.’

The Economist has a weekly podcast called Editor’s Picks, in which it reads (!) articles from the latest issue. To enjoy the cover story with a British accent, click here.

Image courtesy: The Economist