Facebook’s Brian Boland: Measurement Is About People

Facebook vice president of ads product marketing Brian Boland discussed the sector’s shift to mobile and its related challenges at Dmexco in Cologne, Germany.

Facebook vice president of ads product marketing Brian Boland discussed the sector’s shift to mobile and its related challenges at Dmexco in Cologne, Germany.

Boland’s entire talk is available in a post on the Atlas blog, and highlights follow:

On how rapidly mobile emerged:

To reach 50 million people, it took radio and TV 38 and 13 years, respectively, but within just seven years, mobile technology had reached 1.4 billion people. When you look at the U.S. media landscape, 24 percent of the time people spend consuming media is on mobile, with mobile making up 16 percent of ad budgets–that’s huge, and it’s growing.

Now 76 percent of Facebook’s ad revenue comes from mobile. But this isn’t just about a shift to mobile, it’s about new behaviors. Today, 60 percent of total Internet time is spent on mobile applications. Yet even with that growth on mobile, people continue to use desktop. While people may still be searching on desktop, paying bills or watching long form content, mobile is where discovery, communication and entertainment happens.

On measurement challenges:

Today’s measurement has to be about people. The cookie measurement technology that marketers have relied on for years doesn’t work on mobile, and the data isn’t accurate enough. Cookies run at a rate of about 65 percent accuracy. That means that more than one-third of cookie-based advertising is irrelevant to the people it’s reaching. Those experiences are bad for brands and bad for people.

People-based marketing is the future. We understand the billion-and-a-half people on Facebook. And we can learn so much from all of them; their likes, their online behavior and how they interact with each other. This opens up amazing opportunities for brands, as they build their marketing strategies for today and for a future which is only going to be more fragmented, more agile and even more mobile.

Readers: What did you think of Boland’s comments?

BrianBoland650