Bloomberg Businessweek Relaunches With a Subscription Model and Regional Versions

Plus a new app and newsletter

A Bloomberg Businessweek redesign was already in the plans when Megan Murphy was announced as editor of the publication in November. Along with the announcement came a detail about the redesign, a promise from Bloomberg editor in chief John Micklethwait and Bloomberg Media CEO Justin Smith that “what will emerge from this will be very different from the stand-alone magazine you all write for at the moment.”

The new Businessweek is here, redesigned in both its print and digital formats with changes that follow in the direction of some recent publisher trends.

For one, Bloomberg Businessweek is going the paywalled route (after the first four stories each month) and is offering two subscription models: digital only and all access. The digital only offering is actually more than digital only, and includes 6-8 print issues per year. It also comes with access to a redesigned app and a new newsletter called Daily IQ that hits inboxes each afternoon.

The all access will give you everything in the digital subscription plus the weekly print magazine and additional offerings in line with its self-description of the subscription as a membership: access to a quarterly conference call and free livestreams of certain Bloomberg events.

Many of the new offerings are differentiated by region. The magazine itself will come in three different versions–an American, European and Asian edition. The newsletter and app will each offer differentiated content by regional as well.

The magazine also delves into lifestyle coverage by adding Pursuits coverage to the back of the book.

“It was a very different time when we first acquired the magazine,” says Murphy in an interview on Bloomberg Surveillance. “It’s a more serious time, a more somber time, and we want the quality of the journalism to shine through so we’ve made it cleaner, we’ve added new digital products, a new app, new website, new journalism.”

Bloomberg purchased the then 80-year-old Businessweek from McGraw-Hill in 2009. Since then it has dropped the uppercase W in the name, taken the magazine through a few previous redesigns and moved the site from a standalone to a vertical on Bloomberg.com. That, like everything else in the Businessweek universe, has now been redesigned.