5 Lists of Takeaways From BlogWorld Expo NY

At its first Big Apple event, BlogWorld presented a nearly overwhelming agenda of sessions accented by the cricket sound of laptop keyboards, discrete iPad envy glances, “attending” multiple sessions by following the hashtag stream and, one hopes, more than a few “Ah-Ha!” moments for everyone.After the jump, the first of two posts of my somewhat random, totally opinionated takeaways from some of the sessions in which I participated at BlogWorld Expo NY.

At its first Big Apple event, BlogWorld Expo presented a nearly overwhelming agenda of sessions accented by the cricket sound of laptop keyboards, discrete iPad envy glances, “attending” multiple sessions by following the hashtag stream and, one hopes, more than a few “Ah-Ha!” moments for everyone.

In the first of two posts, here are my somewhat random, totally opinionated takeaways from some of the sessions in which I participated at Blogworld Expo NY.

8 tweetables from Jay Baer, co-author of The Now Revolution

Jay pitches himself as a hype-free strategist and speaker. He “walked the walk” during his presentation.

  1. Social media is paradise for the passive-aggressive.
  2. Twitter and Facebook are not what will transform your business. Your business needs to empower your employees to act socially in a social business context.
  3. If you don’t trust your employees with the execution of your social media strategies, you don’t have a social problem. You have a hiring problem.
  4. Hire for passion, train for skills.
  5. Social media is the ultimate canary in the coalmine. A Google alert may tell you something is happening, but you have to be truly listening to understand what is happening.
  6. Social media is not improvisation. It requires governance and experiential learning.
  7. There is no shortage of measures of social media success. The problem is determining which are relevant to your company.
  8. The difference between selling and helping is just two letters. [My comment: Sales cloaked in helpfulness is still sales. No one should have a problem with that.]

My “big picture” takeaway from Jay’s session is that the ubiquity and visibility of social media may (should?) force companies to address corporate cultural issues that, in the past, could be ignored without significant impediment to success. That raises a few questions:

  • While social media may provide a different toolkit than was previously available, does it necessarily make these changes easier?
  • If everyone in a company is now engaged in social media, what other parts of their jobs may need to be reassigned?

5 tweetables on influence from Jason Keath of Social Fresh

Jason explored the meaning and implications of influence that go beyond a Klout score.

  1. Consumer conversion is the tip of the iceberg. You need to know what’s going on under the surface.
  2. There are two kinds of experts: Personal and societal. The job of social media marketing is to nurture and leverage the former.
  3. There are five building blocks of influence: Authority, relevance, audience, frequency and emotion.
  4. Create influencers: Work with bloggers who have the potential to positively influence your brand to actually do so.
  5. Influence does not imply expertise. Whether your influencers are experts or celebrity endorsers depends on your business plan.

19 online reputation management tips from Shashi Bellamkonda of Network Solutions

BlogWorld attendees could not miss the great social vibe of the Network Solutions’ team. Observe what they are doing and steal what’s appropriate for your business.

Ways to build your brand’s reputation

  1. Thought leadership conversations
  2. Community building through content
  3. Extend your brand
  4. Local events
  5. Social research
  6. Real time virtual events
  7. Transparency during crisis
  8. Advisory board
  9. Outreach to senders
  10. Multimedia story telling

Shashi’s takeaways

  1. Consistent message across all channels
  2. Clear expression of social media mission
  3. Transparent about expectations
  4. Friendly conversations (reverse your scowls)
  5. Move deeper discussions to PUT (pick up the phone)
  6. Build relationships early
  7. Changing perception requires participation
  8. Approaching people at a personal level to change minds
  9. Build trust and credibility over time

7 random notes

  1. Via Smart Brief on Social Media: I think I learn as much about public speaking at these conferences as I do about social media.
  2. Via Chris Baggott: Marketing/advertising used to be linear like bowling. Now, it’s pinball.
  3. Via Thomas Hynes, PR Newswire: Ask yourself: Would you read what you share?
  4. Via Jeffrey Hayzlett: Social media is a different way, not a replacement way.
  5. Via Gary Vaynerchuk: You can’t read about pushups. You’ve got to do them.
  6. Excellent coverage of BlogWorld Expo NY has been posted by Andrea Cook on Social Fresh and Lisa Barone on Outspoken Media.
  7. Related posts on Social Times include 5 Steps to Successful Blogger Outreach and Listen to the Sound of Your Business.

2 items from Neil’s “snark” list

Props to the BlogWorld organizers, presenters, exhibitors and participants for their contribution to the “social” exchange of knowledge this week. Of course, nothing is perfect to a kid born in the Bronx.

  1. The Javits Center did not disappoint — it rode the current trend of meeting facilities with crappy WiFi service. At a facility that generally overcharges for poor quality, well, everything, this came as no surprise. Perhaps conference organizers can put WiFi performance at the top of their requirements’ list when negotiating with venues.
  2. There’s fabulous research on application usability. Apparently, these best practices don’t relate to conference calendars on websites and mobile. Navigation that does not require hitting the “back” button so frequently, integration with iCal and Google calendars, offline operation on mobile devices and keeping past days’ schedules available for reference are just a few suggestions.

More tomorrow.

 

Neil Glassman is principal marketing strategist at WhizBangPowWow, with a track record of success across linear, digital and social media. Join his conversation on Twitter or email Neil to talk about marketing or swap recipes.