AppLift Reveals Engagement and Usage Patterns for Major App Types

AppLift described social media app usage as a ‘snacking behavior,’ with an average session length of two minutes and 30 seconds. Users launch these apps 25 times per month, on average.

AppLift, in partnership with Localytics, has released a new infographic highlighting app engagement and usage patterns across a variety of app types, as well as the impact push messages have on app engagement.

Specifically, the infographic details patterns across news, entertainment, social media and music apps, and found the average time per month spent in each type of app has increased from 2014 to 2015. For instance, the infographic showed users, on average, have spent 63 minutes per month in social media apps in 2015, up from 31 minutes per month last year.

AppLift described social media app usage as a ‘snacking behavior,’ with an average session length of two minutes and 30 seconds. Users launch these apps 25 times per month, on average. While they’re used in the most individual sessions, session length for social media apps was found to be the lowest, with news apps having an average session length of six minutes, entertainment apps coming in at eight minutes, and music apps leading the pack at nine minutes.

In terms of engagement, the infographic showed users who opt-in to receive push messages from apps will open those apps more often, with music apps seeing the most increased engagement, at 177 percent.

Tim Koschella, CEO of AppLift, told SocialTimes:

Understanding and leveraging patterns of user behavior is a key success factor for app publishers, for both their in-app marketing activities and advertising efforts. The study we conducted together with Localytics and the resulting infographic reflects that apps continue to drive increased engagement for the media & entertainment vertical, with distinctive typical use cases across its specific sub-categories.

Check out the full infographic below.

Top image courtesy of Shutterstock.

A World of Engagement