Another Movie Tradition Lost to Social Media: Oscar Balloting

The Academy sent a letter to its roughly 6,000 voting members advising them that an electronic system for Oscar voting will be implemented “as early as this year, and will certainly be in effect by next year,” according to the New York Times.

The Academy of Motion Pictures Art and Sciences, which presents the Oscars every year, has officially set the Oscar ballot process into the social media bubble. That’s right, very soon, the annual mailing of the official Oscar ballots, which is one of the most traditional aspects of the annual Academy Awards cycle, will be history.

The Academy sent a letter to its roughly 6,000 voting members advising them that an electronic system for Oscar voting will be implemented “as early as this year, and will certainly be in effect by next year,” according to the New York Times.

The letter was signed by Kimberly Roush, the academy’s director of membership. The letter asked members for a personal email address that is distinct from anything that goes to an assistant or intermediary. At some time when the system is up and running the mailed ballots will be eliminated. Another great movie tradition is gone because of social media. Alas!

The speculation is that the obvious shift to electronic voting could have enormous impact on the awards season. The time in which it takes mailed ballots to arrive compared to electronic ballots needs no speculation. The academy’s governors could move the awards night from late February to an earlier weekend.

Then, the factor of earlier awards presentation versus later awards presentation means a great deal to the studios. Having a presentation in late February means more promotional time for the nominated movies. Earlier presentation means less time to think about the movies means less attention to them over all, and perhaps fewer ticket sales.

Apparently, academy officials have been wary of an electronic system. For obvious reasons, joining social media bubble comes with its hackers and breaches. And, a valid learning curve for those who are part of the older generation and decline involvement with a digital lifestyle or social media.