After 9/11, Media Changed and Remained the Same

An online rendering of the 9/11 Memorial.
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As we approach the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, the media is filled with retrospectives of every kind.

Today, Poynter analyzes the way that the media and media consumption has changed in the 10 years since that day. Comparing the way we learned about the 9/11 attacks to the way we first heard about the death of Osama bin Laden, the article illustrates the impact that digital media has had, but still makes the case for the importance of traditional media outlets.

“Those trusted news teams work in this environment – not against it, but in the midst. They eavesdrop on the conversation to seek more information and to see how people are reacting to the news. They distribute what they know via expensive broadcast towers and printing presses, but also with the same free tools available to anyone with a computer and a Web connection,” the story says.

Our colleagues at FishbowlNY have been running a daily post taking a look back on that day from the point of view of New York’s broadcast journalists. And TV journalists across the board have been recounting their own stories and preparing for 9/11 programmingNew York magazine, this week, published a 9/11 encyclopedia that details all the people, places, and things that became familiar since then. And there are tributes, features, and retrospectives in  The New York Times, The Washington Post, the New York Daily News, the New York Post, and countless other outlets.

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