Adweek.com’s Top 10 Publishing Stories of 2013

Tina Brown, the death of the magazine app and that infamous Rolling Stone cover

Here are the 10 most-read press stories published on Adweek.com in 2013:

10. Men's Fitness Magazine Is Remade as a Lifestyle Brand
By Lucia Moses
Two years ago, Men’s Fitness put Vin Diesel on its cover, wearing a red, body-hugging T-shirt and surrounded by coverlines that screamed “Instant muscle” and “53 fat-burning tips.” Vin is back for the June issue, and while he’s still showing off his biceps, this time he’s sporting John Varvatos and Banana Republic.
Read the full story.

9. Wired Taps Real Journalists to Push Further Into Native Advertising
By Lucia Moses
Brands want advertising that looks and feels like actual editorial content, and publishers are uniquely positioned to help. But how do they do that without selling out?
Read the full story.

8. Millennials Unhappy With Businessweek Campaign Mocking Them
By Lucia Moses
Bloomberg Businessweek took an interesting approach in its effort to court millennials when it shamed them for still living at home with mom and dad and then invited them to subscribe, and the backlash has begun.
Read the full story.

7. Branded Content Moves the Needle, Per Forbes
By Lucia Moses
Branded content, or its hyped cousin, native advertising, is supposed to combat ad fatigue when consumers are bombarded with ads all day, everywhere. The problem is measuring effectiveness. With no agreement on how to measure native (much less how to define it), it’s no surprise that publishers are eager to prove that native advertising, with its promise of premium rates, works.
Read the full story.

6. Stores Boycotting Rolling Stone's Boston Bomber Cover
By Emma Bazilian
Rolling Stone has never shied away from provocative covers: From a stylized image of Charles Manson to a topless Janet Jackson, the magazine has successfully riled the American public for decades. But its latest cover, featuring alleged Boston bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, has elicited a new level of controversy.
Read the full story.

5. The New Yorker's Anthony Weiner Cover Draws Praise on Twitter
By David Taintor
Even as legacy news organizations work to find their footing online, the power of print endures on social media. Such was the case this morning when The New Yorker published its forthcoming magazine cover online, which presents a caricature of floundering New York mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner.
Read the full story.

4. Jann Wenner Discusses Putting His Son in Charge
By Lucia Moses
Jann Wenner has picked his son, Gus, 22, to head up Rollingstone.com, overseeing its editorial and business operations. And while critics were quick to cry nepotism, the senior Wenner told Adweek that his son had to prove himself like anyone else.
Read the full story.

3. The New York Times Reinvents the Boring Banner Ad
By Lucia Moses
An obscure piece on The New York Times’ website about Picasso repurposing his canvases by painting over older, abandoned projects was fascinating, at least insofar as stories about master artists and their recycling habits go. But let’s face it—it wasn’t exactly click bait.
Read the full story.

2. Following NewsBeast Mess, What's Tina Brown's Next Act?
By Lucia Moses
Now that IAC/Interactive has sold off Newsweek, can Tina Brown’s act be nearing its end? The experiment to combine Newsweek and The Daily Beast was an acknowledged failure. Brown was the founding editor of the Beast before she added editorial oversight for Newsweek when the two merged; it’s conceivable she’ll go back to just editing the Beast. But it's not hard to imagine her moving on. The question is, to where?
Read the full story.

1. Who Killed the Magazine App?
By Lucia Moses
While print advertising—still by far the lifeblood of the magazine business—continues to contract, ad units in magazine tablet editions have soared 22 percent so far this year versus last. It would appear reassuring for publishers desperate to grow their businesses beyond the core yet shrinking print product. But the fact is that many of those tablet ad units are merely pickups from print—meaning that advertisers paid not a nickel for them.
Read the full story.