Twenty Years Ago Today, the Web Was Born

Twenty years ago today, the software required to connect to the nascent World Wide Web was made publicly and freely available by creator Tim Berners-Lee and his employer, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN.

On April 30, 1993, the software required to connect to the nascent World Wide Web was made publicly and freely available by creator Tim Berners-Lee and his employer, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, or CERN.

“By making the software required to run a web server freely available, along with a basic browser and a library of code, the web was allowed to flourish,” CERN said today in a statement.

CERN and Lee published the world’s first website, a starter kid for the World Wide Web project, hosted on Berners-Lee’s NeXT computer.

The website has long since gone defunct, but in honor of the 20th anniversary of the open Internet, CERN has taken it live again, using the still-operable NeXT machine.

In 1993, Internet information retrieval systems such as WAIS and Gopher were available, but free access and the ease of use of Berners-Lee’s software spurred rapid adoption of the medium.

Berners-Lee continues to be an advocate for open protocols, available freely to all users, rather than proprietary software and platforms.

 

20 Years Ago Today, the Web Was Born