Angela Natividad

Angela Natividad

Adweek contributor
Angela Natividad is a frequent contributor to Adweek's creativity blog, AdFreak. She is also the author of Generation Creation and co-founder of Hurrah, an esports agency. She lives in Paris and when she isn't writing, she can be found picking food off your plate.

How Ikea Used This Ad Full of Naked People to Sell Tables

Some 79% of important decisions are made around a table. With that small and seemingly innocuous factoid in hand, ad agency Buzzman illustrates how choices made around an Ikea table just might change your life.

#ILookLikeAnEngineer Movement Sparks an Outpouring of Solidarity for Tech’s Diversity

To draw more talent, OneLogin recently came up with an innocuous campaign: a series of print ads featuring a few engineers, flanked by short testimonials about their working environments.Featured engineers were mostly men, but one was a woman. Her name is Isis Wenger. And she had no idea the impact her image would end up having.

Here’s One Exceptionally Devious Way to Sell Life Jackets

Convincing people to wear life vests can be tricky, even if it seems like common sense.So, to drive home the importance of water safety—and plug its Izeber 50 floating model—French water sports brand Tribord invented a canned beverage called Wave, then dubbed it "the worst drink in the world" and offered it to passersby on a seaside boardwalk.

Here’s the Steamy Video to Go With Calvin Klein’s Sexting Billboards

Building on last week's digital-dating print campaign, Calvin Klein is taking its #mycalvins play for the Tinder and Grindr generation into the live-action realm.

Why These 3 Agency Guys Are Walking 125 Miles to a Company’s Office for a Pitch

It's good to walk a mile in your client's shoes. But is it even better to walk 125 miles?Le Balene will soon find out. The Italian agency is wooing an unnamed mobile accessories client with a unique stunt: Pitch them by walking from the agency's home in Milan to the client's office in Reggio Emilia—a distance of some 200 kilometers, or about 125 miles.

This French Drink Brand Took 7 Days to Post the World’s Slowest Facebook Status

Pulco, a French drink brand owned by Orangina Schweppes, is a default summer drink. (Because when else would you have a cool citrus-lemon beverage?) And amid an epic heat wave recently, it capitalized on that positioning with #LaParesseADuBon. Roughly translated to "Laziness can be good," it encouraged people to relax and go slow—because what else is there to do when you see mirages while crossing the street?Earlier this month, with help from agency Fred & Farid, it illustrated that premise by taking seven days to finish posting a single-line Facebook status update. The post unfolded word by word, and eventually read, "It's too hot to work."And while it's too late to watch it as it happened, you can see the painfully slow progression when you click on the post's "Edited" button:

Sweden’s Favorite Fishy Paste Delights in Disgusting the Rest of the World With It

Ever hear of Kalles Kaviar? It's cod roe, and you eat it out of a toothpaste tube.Cringe away, but Kalles is a beloved Swedish product. They put it over eggs and eat it on toast. It's basically Sweden's Marmite. To drive sales, parent company Orkla tapped Forsman & Bodenfors to produce a self-deprecating campaign. For the last year, Kalles has been traveling the world, seeking to initiate others—unsuccessfully, to put it mildly—in the Swedish taste of home.

A Ticket to This Music Festival in Transylvania Will Cost You Two Pints of Blood

To sell tickets to its inaugural event, the Transylvania-based Untold Music Festival is working the Dracula angle. In partnership with Romania's National Blood Transfusion Institute, it has launched "Pay With Blood," a campaign that lets you buy a day pass with plasma.

#MakeAChildCry Ads Remind Shocked Commuters That Sometimes Pain Means Love

For the past two weeks, metro and subway riders throughout Western Europe looked up from their phones to find enormous close-up posters of toddlers whose expressions can only be described with words the Bible used for newbies to hell: There is much weeping and gnashing of teeth. These images are explained with little more than a hashtag: #MakeAChildCry.