LoJack Revamps Its Radio Ads; Adds Print



By David Gianatasio





BOSTON–Greenberg Seronick O’Leary & Partners is targeting businesses and individual consumers with a campaign touting LoJack’s stolen vehicle police recovery system.





The new creative work marks a departure for LoJack, which is testing billboards and print ads after having relied on radio ads in the past, said Peter Alemian, the Greenberg Seronick vice president who oversees the account. Radio helped build LoJack’s reputation but lacks the emotional power of visual elements; the agency believes these are needed to drive home key selling points and keep the business growing, Alemian said.





A pair of billboards recently unveiled on busy New England highways feature offbeat visual components. One board is dominated by a gaping hole shaped like a car. The copy reads, ‘If this car had LoJack, the police could have it back by tomorrow’s commute.’ A second board depicts a jailhouse scene with the line, ‘Stealing a car with LoJack can really take you places.’





A print execution shows a copy machine ‘parked’ on a city street. The headline reads, ‘You wouldn’t leave expensive office equipment out here without protection. So why do it with your company’s cars?’ The ad is now appearing in Fleet Magazine, a journal that targets limousine companies and other businesses that lease cars.





Greenberg Seronick has even recast LoJack radio spots in the year it has worked on the account. Rather than rely exclusively on stories from car owners whose vehicles were recovered through LoJack, the agency has added insurance agent testimonials in an attempt to diversify the message and broaden the campaign’s appeal, Alemian said.





Greenberg Seronick picked up the Dedham, Mass.-based client about a year ago. At the time, annual billings on the account–the creative portion of which had been handled in-house–were said to be in the $5-6 million range.





Gary Greenberg and Peter Seronick served as creative directors on the LoJack campaign. Craig Johnson wrote the copy. Kevin Daly was the art director.








Copyright ASM Communications, Inc. (1997) ALL RIGHTS RESERVED





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