The departure of president Andy Berlin, along with DDB Needham’s signature Volkswagen account, is just the beginning of an agency overhaul that will result in an enti" data-categories = "" data-popup = "" data-ads = "Yes" data-company = "[]" data-outstream = "yes" >

DDB Needham plans major tune-up By Alison Fahe

The departure of president Andy Berlin, along with DDB Needham’s signature Volkswagen account, is just the beginning of an agency overhaul that will result in an enti

DDB executives would not comment on future plans. But sources said DDB has mapped out its “cluster” concept and is beginning to divide up accounts and personnel.
Sources also said that despite Berlin’s new role as chairman of the newly created Berlin, Wright & Cameron, he will continue to be in contact with key DDB clients and even is expected to play a role in either the formation of the new units or in the running of them.
Executive vp/director of development Kent DeFelice is expected to head up one group, comprised of such clients as Amtrak and Seagram. Executive vp Peter Tate might also get his own group which will be responsible for Hershey’s, Cigna, NEC Technologies, Michelin and the Bermuda accounts. Mary Lou Quinlan, who heads up new business, will be in charge of Johnson & Johnson, James River and New York State Lottery, sources said.
Berlin’s responsibilities will be assumed by Reinhard and John Bernbach, president of DDB Needham Worldwide.
DDB has experience in setting up customized service units. Last year, the agency set up Focus GTE, a Dallas-based unit devoted to the communications giant.
Looking back, Berlin’s 15-month stint at the helm of DDB has been action-packed. Soon after his arrival, Berlin faced possible client defections from several clients. GTE stablized after Berlin set up Focus GTE. Meanwhile, DDB’s relationship with Bristol-Myers Squibb, which had begun to unravel long before Berlin’s arrival, became even more tense until the company and agency finally severed their relationship in June. However, DDB quickly recouped, pulling in some $30 million in Johnson & Johnson billings in July as part of a larger agency realignment.
Copyright Adweek L.P. (1993)