American Pharoah Reps Are in Talks to Put the Triple Crown Winner on a Wheaties Box

It would make plenty of horse sense

Since American Pharoah won horse racing's first Triple Crown in 37 years on Saturday evening, branded merchandise sales have predictably been through the roof, and seemingly everyone wants a piece of history.

But that may just be the first leg in another winning race for the 3-year-old thoroughbred. A source close to the situation told Adweek today the horse's marketing team is in talks with General Mills to put American Pharoah on a Wheaties box.

Minneapolis-based General Mills wasn't immediately available for comment.

Whether or not the two sides meet on financials remains to be seen, but the move would make plenty of sense. There would be considerable social media buzz about what would likely be the first nonhuman athlete to saddle into the coveted, breakfast-table real estate. According to Amobee Brand Intelligence, "American Pharoah" was tweeted 694,197 times on June 6, the day he became part of sports history.

Collectors would snatch up boxes of Wheaties and put them in plastic bags in storage. That could provide a nice uptick in sales. Plenty more folks would probably choose Wheaties over another cereal-bowl classic—Corn Flakes or Cheerios, for instance—simply because they watched and enjoyed Saturday's thrilling race.

It's not the #CallMeCaitlyn Wheaties box that many clamored for last week after transgender pioneer Caitlyn Jenner—who appeared as Bruce Jenner on the cereal boxes decades ago—revealed her identity on the cover of Vanity Fair. But American Pharoah would still be met with enthusiasm.

American Pharoah's management team—which includes Egyptian-American owner Ahmed Zayat, Hall of Fame trainer Bob Baffert and legendary jockey Victor Espinoza—has already shown a willingness to capitalize on the horse's success with branding partnerships with Burger King, Wheels Up and Monster Energy for the Belmont Stakes.

So the Wheaties tie-up, if it happens, could be just the start for a legend in the making in terms of branding plays after the Triple Crown win.