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GoPro Ad With Toddlers Sledding Is the Most Adorable 30 Seconds You'll Watch Today Their first time in the snow

Being a little kid is the best. Everything is new and different, the world is your oyster, and you don't even know it. And your first snow day ... wow, words can barely express the magical bliss for a toddler.

GoPro does it again, this time with a perfect vignette of a California brother and sister's first snow day in Vermont. First, we see Quincy rollicking around having an amazing time, and then Stella, who looks to be just old enough to talk, gets on a camera-mounted sled, and we experience her mind being blown on her first ride down a hill. Her reaction is truly priceless.

You'll want to watch it "again."

October 23, 2014, 2:24 PM EDT

Are These Feminist Superhero Panties Empowering, or a Tiny Bit Weird? Amelia Earhart and more join this Dear Kate collection

The underwear brand Dear Kate, a big proponent of using real people instead of models, has a new plan to empower women: It's putting inspiring female faces right on its panties.

Its League of Ladies Collection features illustrations of four historical women—Marie Curie, Harriet Tubman, Amelia Earhart and Frida Kahlo—reimagined as superheroes.



Additionally, Dear Kate has called on real-life influencers to model the collection, including science communicator Kelly Carnes, actor and playwright Zoe Travis, Golly Magazine editor Roxanne Fequiere, and comedian Jackie Zebrowski.

With names like "Supermarie" and "Superfrida," the panties feature a cartoon depiction of each woman's face on the front and a design on the back. Which begs the question, are women even wearing panties with cartoons on them? I asked Twitter, where reactions varied from a resounding no to an open-minded maybe:

I love the idea of celebrating extraordinary women, but I wonder if this is an idea best suited for a (much) younger crowd.

I highly respect and admire Amelia Earhart, but I don't know if I want to see her face every time I pull off a pair of jeans. I would, however, absolutely buy an 8-year-old girl a cute camisole and panties set featuring Marie Curie with a little hang tag that gives her a short lesson on Curie's scientific accomplishments. (Business idea, Dear Kate, if you want to come out with a Dear McKenna line.)

We've seen how people react to brands that empower women, and I'm reulctant to criticize any effort to promote strong women. So allow me to soften the blow by saying that while I wouldn't buy superhero panties for myself (and I am the target market), Dear Kate's Sporty Bralets are off the chain.

October 23, 2014, 1:54 PM EDT

People With No Brains Star in Hilarious Ads for Other Kinds of Organ Donation Utter stupidity put to good use

Next time you're at a party and some bro is doing a kegstand on a diving board over an empty swimming pool, you might consider letting the situation play out. 

Ad agency Duval Guillaume and Belgian nonprofit Reborn to Be Alive take an amusingly fresh approach to organ donation in a new campaign—with photos and videos of people doing seriously dumb and dangerous things, followed by the line: "Eight of his organs can be donated. Luckily for us, his brain is not one of them."

Take a look at the ads below, see these Darwin Award contenders in action.

Via Design Taxi.

Click to Read More →

October 23, 2014, 11:02 AM EDT

Organic Food Snobs Are Unknowingly Fed McDonald's, and They're Lovin' It In unofficial prank, experts can't tell the difference

You probably have a few friends so opinionated about the sourcing and quality of their food, part of you wants to test whether they'd really know the difference between crap and cuisine.

You love those friends, but you also think they're being snobs, and you'd just love to troll them hard. 

Well now you don't have to, because two guys named Sacha and Cedrique did it for you. As you can see in the video below, they're on a mission to prank organic food experts in the Netherlands. They pack their bags full of a mix of McDonald's food and real organic food and present it to these connoisseurs of the finer things in life.

Check out this hilarious culinary experiment and skip to about the 2-minute mark if you want to see the real golden nuggets.  

Via Gizmodo. 

October 23, 2014, 9:39 AM EDT

Brad Pitt Dodges Insults to Make a Charity Pitch on Zach Galifianakis' Between Two Ferns Actor plugs a few projects amid a hail of abuse

One of the best things about Between Two Ferns is how the guests have to plug their projects in the least comfortable way possible—indeed, while getting showered with insults.

Brad Pitt is the latest victim, sitting down with Zach Galifianakis to discuss acting, handsomeness, his wife and his ex-wife (well, the character she played on Friends). But he does manage to get the job done—plugging both his new movie and his Make It Right charitable organization.

He gets away mostly unscathed, too.

 

October 23, 2014, 9:39 AM EDT

Infographic: What the Color of Your Logo Says About Your Brand Also, how much some famous logos cost to design

Photo: Getty Images

Few design projects seem to require as much deep thinking as a corporate logo (some would say overthinking—remember Twitter's tortured explanation for its new logo in 2012)?

One of the most basic decisions for any logo, though, is color. And if you think color choice isn't really that important, well—someday you're going to be beaten up by a psychologist.

The infographic below explains a bit more about logos and their color—as well as the cost, value and evolution over time of some well-known corporate marks.

October 23, 2014, 9:01 AM EDT

Brita Built a City Out of Sugar to Show You What a Lifetime of Soda Looks Like A can a day eventually adds up to 221,314 cubes

In the past, water filter brand Brita has targeted plastic bottles as public enemy No. 1, but now it has its sights on a new foe: soda.

A new spot created by DDB California uses towering piles of sugar cubes to show the impact of drinking one sugary soda a day (which would be pretty a moderate intake for some families). In the ad, we see a stack of cubes illustrating a single day of cola, followed by a skyscraper modeled from a year's sugar, ending on a cityscape built from the 221,314 sugar cubes a soda fan could consume "over an average adult lifetime."

It's a striking visual, one taken even further by the brand's #ChooseWater campaign in an exhibit this week at New York's Chelsea Market, where roughly 1 million sugar cubes (weighing 7,000 pounds) were shaped into an even larger skyline to reflect the amount consumed by a family of four over their lifetimes:

The sculpture features 28 buildings, varying in height from 2 to 7 feet. That's one tall drink of terrifying.

October 22, 2014, 7:27 PM EDT

Holy Crap, Someone Is Actually Making a Working Hoverboard for Real This Time And you're gonna want one

Marty McFly and Tony Hawk both drove demand for hoverboards—but alas, supply has been nonexistent, as both of them had to rely on camera trickery and special effects. 

But now, finally, we're getting a glimpse of the first prototype of a functioning hoverboard. Hendo is the company producing this miracle of engineering, and it's launched a Kickstarter that lets you help bring it to market.

What's cool is you can support it by donating and even buying the development kit and experimenting with "The Whitebox"—a floating box that uses the same technology as the hoverboard. They've also drawn up plans for hoverparks, which are coated with hoverboard-friendly material so you can float around and try to be the first to pioneer a new sport.

Take a look at the pitch video and also check out the fascinating Kickstarter page.

October 22, 2014, 2:15 PM EDT

Barton F. Graf Has a Clever Idea for Getting More Men to Become Mentors Excuse them from jury duty, and soon you'll need fewer juries

Esquire recently asked three ad agencies to help with its male mentoring initiative. Today, Barton F. Graf 9000 unveiled its campaign: a political initiative to establish mentorship of children as a legal excusal from jury duty. The idea is that more mentors would mean better guidance for at-risk youth, and eventually, reduced crime rates and the need for fewer jurors in the first place.

The proposed Mentor Act is explained in a print ad in Esquire's October issue. The ad itself could be mailed to state representatives, and it also points to TheMentorAct.org, which features a powerful film—directed by Michael Bonfiglio of Radical Media—asking prisoners who their mentors were. The bill can also be sent to lawmakers directly from the site.



"Ultimately, The Mentor Act aims to use the same court system that convicts people to help children avoid committing crimes and entering the court system in the first place," say Barton F. Graf and Esquire, which are "already beginning talks with state politicians to adopt this bill and hope to move the bill forward on a state-by-state basis."

The other two agencies that got involved in the Esquire project are Makeable and 72andSunny. The former built a campaign around the website webuildmen.org, while the latter made ads with the theme "F*ck off, I'm helping." See three of those ads below.

72andSunny's work for Esquire:

Click to Read More →

October 22, 2014, 1:39 PM EDT

Craigslist Is the Setting for This Interactive Music Video About Humanity, or at Least Weird Ads 72andSunny gets classified

Craigslist might be best for making a couple bucks off that one-wheeled leopard-print bicycle your ex left behind, and it's just that kind of random human curio that makes the classified site the inspiration for—and theme of—this new interactive music video created by 72andSunny's in-house creative school 72U.

Set to the song "Catch a Break" by the group Superhuman Happiness (founded by Stuart Bogie, who's played with the likes of Arcade Fire), the project's website is designed to look like Craigslist, with sparse blue links. When clicked, they lead to various pop-ups—150 in total—emulating the kinds of posts found on the real Craigslist.

The point, according to the agency, is to capture the human experience, and illustrate how "all of your life—heartbreak, happiness and surplus appliances—can be contained in a message board like Craigslist."

That might be a a stretch, but the fake ads at least do a pretty good job of capturing the often-weird spirit of the iconic site (if not the heights of glory and depths of shame found in its finest, most insane postings). The ads range from emo, to desperate, to pseudo-philosophical, to touching, to ridiculous, to name just a few.



Perhaps best (that is to say, most true to Craigslist form) is the legal category—one post, titled "Free Divorce Advice," wonders "Where are all the almost single ladies at?" Another, titled "You pay I counsel," reads, sic, "I just got paralegal very professional master certificate from university. I sue to make you feel so good. Forget about about wife, husband, car, work. Why worry? Relax time. It’s gonna be good. You pay in form of gold watch, expensive jewelry, deli meats, credit card, or traveler check. No American Express. NO AMERICAN EXPRESS."

72U's seven-person team created the website with a budget of less than $1,000, and the video will launch in a not-at-all-spammy way with 275 real Craigslist posts in 11 categories in 25 cities. Whether it fits the song, we'll leave to you—the "Haiku" link pops up parts of the lyrics, pieced together after the jump.

And if you don't have the patience to play with the interactive site (coded for Google Chrome), there's a static demo version of the video below, which includes the obligatory strange geek salute: a GIF of a man humping a robot before they both explode under the header "When will humans be able to love machines?"—posted, naturally, in the biotech and science section.

Click to Read More →

October 22, 2014, 12:37 PM EDT

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