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Swedish Insurer Still Magically Making Everything Better Burglary spot follows burned-out toy store

Do you believe in magic? Forsman & Bodenfors and director Adam Berg play visual tricks once more—with movable sets and deft camerawork instead of CGI—in this Swedish spot for If Insurance. A middle-aged couple returns home to find their place ransacked. But it magically morphs back to normal—a metaphor for the client's magic claims handling. As in a previous spot, set in a burned-out toy store, this ad is impressive and memorable, and packed with great details. Particularly notable is the wall-mounted TV hanging askew with the screen showing black-and-white footage of a Beatles-esque pop group singing the client's "Don't you worry 'bout a thing" jingle. The transformation is cued by the song, and once the house returns to normal, the TV is shown pristinely back in place. In the previous ad, the song was delivered by a weird ukelele player astride a rocking horse. Thankfully, he doesn't appear here. I suspect he was the one who set the toy store on fire, and now he's added burglary to his rap sheet. Still, the new spot doesn't pack quite the same punch as its predecessor. There's just something more "magical" about the toy-store setting. Maybe it's the notion of a child's belief in the fantastical, the expectation that things will quickly be set right with no discernible effort. As if. The insurance game is far from magical, and it would be a dirty trick to make customers spend eternity on hold with "Don't you worry 'bout a thing…" ringing in their ears.

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