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Always Unveils 'Like a Girl' Sequel Showing Girls Redefining the Phrase for Real Scenes of strength, skill and confidence

The original Always "Like a Girl" commercial—which broke last summer and got 56 million views on YouTube before getting a plum Super Bowl ad slot last month—was primarily a challenge. It urged girls to redefine the phrase from one of weakness to one of strength.

Now, with International Women's Day on Sunday, the Procter & Gamble brand has released a follow-up video showing how the meaning of the phrase is already changing.



P&G also released some new stats around the campaign from its Always Puberty & Confidence Wave II Study, conducted pre-Super Bowl. According to that study, 76 percent of women and 59 percent of men ages 16-24 said the video changed their perception of the phrase "like a girl." Also, 81 percent of women said the video can change the way people think about the stereotypes surrounding women's physical abilities.

This spot—created by Leo Burnett, as the original was—won't go megaviral like the first one, simply because the first one had that magical insight. But it's a good way to keep the campaign going.

"The theme of this year's International Women's Day is 'Make It Happen,' and that's exactly what girls are doing by rewriting the meaning of #LikeAGirl," said Always global vp Fama Francisco. The new video celebrates amazing young girls around the globe and encourages everyone to continue the movement every day and everywhere, because together, we're making #LikeAGirl mean amazing things."

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