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Watch This 6-Year-Old and Her Friends Drop F-bombs for Feminism (and to Sell Clothes) A shocking way to deliver a shocking message

Activist T-shirt maker FCKH8 asked the world a question. What makes you more uncomfortable: the way society fucks women, or a little girl saying the work fuck? And it turns out that for a lot of people, the answer is watching a little girl say fuck.

Even though that's the point, and the complainers say they get that's the point, the hilarious part is they just can't get over it. So, of course, they're already crying about child exploitation. Though, if you watch the video, it's pretty clear that these little girls are not shocked by their own potty mouths. In fact, they seem to be having way too much fun. Kids, after all, love breaking the rules.

Still, can't FCKH8 make its point (and sell its shirts) without cursing? Sure, but would people watch? The statistics are old; little girls saying the F-word is pretty much the only new thing in this video. Besides, it was created by a company called FCKH8, not SCREWH8 or DARNH8. They're so comfortable with the F-word they slapped it right in their name.



What I also love is that I think most people who are complaining never got to the end of the video. I say this because there is a 12-year-old boy dressed in a princess costume at the end (making a really good point about how sexism affects men), and not a single YouTube commenter has yet suggested he's going to turn out gay. (UPDATE: The video has actually been removed from YouTube now, but is up on Vimeo.)

Maybe it's a generational thing, but I'm less concerned with the swearing, and more concerned with the loss of innocence that results from telling these 6- to 13-year-olds that between one and five women will be raped in their lifetime and then having them count off and wonder if they're going to be the one. Yes, "fuck" is a sound we've deemed "bad" to say. Rape is a horrific concept that little girls shouldn't ever have to worry about.

And I guess the fact that they will have to worry about it is kind of the problem. Certainly before age 13 these girls will already know about how they're supposed to dress to avoid it, and how they should always walk in groups and not go out too late at night and how to avoid those "rapey" looking alleys and such. You know, the terrifying advice we all give our girls in the hope that it will keep them safe.

Because really, as much as we don't want little girls saying fuck, I think we can all agree that we'd much rather create a world in which no one fucks them.

Video producer Mike Kon (yeah, a guy made this) agrees with me, saying, "Some adults may be uncomfortable with how these little girls are using a bad word for a good cause. It is shocking what they are saying, but … the big statistic that one out of five women are sexually assaulted or raped is something society seems to find less offensive than a little four-letter word, and we love how these girls draw attention to that imbalance."

Speaking of imbalance, one point of amusement: FCKH8's own press release about the video censored the F-word. C'mon, FCKH8, if the little girls can say it, so can you.

October 22, 2014, 9:01 AM EDT

Fred Savage, Hired to Do Honda Voiceovers, Wants to Practice by Narrating Your Home Videos Getting in game shape

Fred Savage will soon be the new voice of Honda. But he's not exactly a voiceover specialist (that's Daniel Stern you're thinking of, Wonder Years fans). So, Honda agency RPA came up with a fun way to help him practice—by having Fred narrate your home videos first.

Anything you've got, feel free to throw at him. Babies, animals, vacations, weddings. Whatever you have documented on film, Savage wants to describe in his presumably dulcet tones. Just tweet your video with the hashtag #HondaPromo to get on the actor's radar.

But are his tones dulcet? RPA says, actually, that Honda is hiring Savage because his voice stands out and doesn't feel like a traditional car spokesperson. So, we'll just have to see how that goes. It's a more reasonable option, anyway, than the plea from someone on Twitter to "bring back Burgess Meredith."

We'll update this post when Savage's first videos come in.

October 21, 2014, 2:52 PM EDT

Wish Old Navy a Happy 20th Birthday, and It Will Make a Giant Balloon Portrait of Your Selfie Just don't get a big head

Everyone knows that if you tell people what you wish for when you blow out the candles on your birthday cake, it's not going to come true. Unless, of course, you wish that you could eat a giant piece of cake in two minutes.

Old Navy turns 20 this year, and to celebrate, it's sharing the fun with a giant machine that takes your selfie and converts it into a giant balloon portrait. Yes, if you happen to be in New York's Times Square on Wednesday or in Los Angeles on Saturday, and you tweet a birthday wish with the hashtag #Selfiebration, you could see your mug rendered in blue balloons. 

It might not be quite as sophisticated as the Grand Prix-winning MegaFaces Pavilion from the Sochi Olympics, but the Selfiebration Machine is a neat contraption consisting of almost five miles of wire and 1,000 balloons custom-made to withstand the city elements. It will generate two selfies per minute, and 1,000 selfies per day. 

My wish is to install this thing in my living room. 

Via Design Taxi.

October 21, 2014, 2:05 PM EDT

This Agency Is Giving $1,500 to Each Employee to Go on an Exotic Vacation. Here's Why 'Some people might call this crazy'

In our latest installment of places where you wish you worked, a California creative agency named thinkParallax recently gave each one of its employees $1,500 and an extra paid day off to travel somewhere they've never been and get inspired. The catch? They have to blog about their journey.

"Some people might call this crazy. We’re calling it Parallaxploration," says the agency. Which is great because parallax is the difference in perspective you get by looking at the same object from two different positions. In other words, the agency's very name suggests that traveling to new places gives you a new perspective on the same old thing.

"The goal of Parallaxploration is not only to ensure happy employees, but also to provide them with energizing experiences that will allow them to continue creating exceptional work for our clients," the agency adds.



The little design inspirations that naturally come from exploring new cultures are exactly what you see in the four blog stories already posted—Germany, Holland, Peru and New Zealand. From ancient to modern, pastoral to urban, those four locations have already created a breadth of influence for creative exploration.

The agency also says it hopes its experiment makes other companies think differently about employee engagement, and I wonder if this sort of thing could catch on. The agency where I work gave each of us a $1,000 Delta credit last year for the same reason, but we didn't blog about our journeys. (Missed opportunity? Or a welcome lack of corporate oversight?)

The important part is, there's nothing preventing this good idea from becoming a movement. Or an individual creative from remembering how important it is to always be open to travel and new experiences.

October 21, 2014, 12:13 PM EDT

Philips Creates a Stunning Explosion of Color and Snow With 'Afterglow' Night skiing becomes a work of art in ad for backlit TVs

If you like any combination of amazing colors, night skiing and striking imagery, Philips has an ad for you.

To promote its color-backlit Ambilight televisions, the electronics manufacturer teamed up with Stockholm agency Ahlstrand & Wållgren, film company Sweetgrass Productions, and a crew of pro skiers to create "Afterglow," a 12-minute clip shot on the slopes at Golden Alpine Holidays in Aleyska, Alaska, under giant color lights during the dead of night. The result is snow like you've never seen it before.

Under 4,000-watt spotlights of varying colors, spraying powder takes on an iridescent quality, calling to mind the pigments thrown during Holi. (As such, it's slightly reminiscent of the project that photographer Chase Jarvis did for Samsung monitors, also featuring colorful dust clouds. Screen manufacturers are generally fond of playing up brilliant, hypnotizing palettes, the most famous example perhaps being Sony Bravia's bouncing balls.)

The skiers also strapped on 7,000-LED suits for some of their downhill runs, making for even more dramatic footage.

If you're not ready to commit to a 12-minute short film, which we've put at the bottom of this post, here's a 3-minute-plus short that gives you a solid idea of what to expect:

A cut of the LED-suit footage posted to Vimeo a week ago has over 1 million views.

Commenters there point out some similarities to other works—one to the 2012 art piece "L.E.D. Surfer" by filmmaker Jacob Sutton, featuring snowboarder William Hughes plying his craft in the dark (but without the polychromatic vibe of the Phillips clip), another to a Sony Xperia smartphone commercial from a few weeks ago featuring night snowboarders in color LED suits (though that one clearly took a fraction of the effort shown in the Philips spot). This summer, Lexus also put out an LED-suit nighttime acrobatics ad. So it's probably safe to call this a trend.

October 21, 2014, 10:58 AM EDT

Watch a Clerk Shock Customers by Haggling Over Groceries in Campaign for Edmunds.com You wouldn't do it for food. Why do it for a car?

It's common practice to haggle for a better price at a car dealership. But at a grocery store? In American supermarkets, at least, it just doesn't happen. Until now.

Car shopping site Edmunds.com, which is dedicated to hassle-free—and haggle-free—car buying, shows the absurdity of haggling in an amusing stunt (via Publicis Kaplan Thaler in New York) where it set up hidden cameras in a grocery store and had the cashier start bargaining with customers over the cost of items.

Edmunds.com found in its research that 83 percent of shoppers hate haggling, yet it's still the way most cars are purchased. And the customers here are clearly uncomfortable, though mostly because the clerk announces outrageously high prices for most things.

Credits below.

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October 21, 2014, 8:01 AM EDT

Without Condoms, Threesome Night Becomes Puzzle Night in This Odd French PSA Don't let this happen to you

When the mood is right but you're all out of condoms, most amorous adventurers would simply run to the 24-hour pharmacy. But in France, the back-up plan seems to be a tad more mundane.

In a series of new anti-AIDS ads from TBWA Paris, the participants in a would-be threeway end up interlocking jigsaw puzzle pieces rather than limbs, and several couples find equally bland ways to spend their naked time together. 

"No condom, no sex" is the tagline for these spots for Aides, the advocacy group behind a wide range of enjoyable videos.

While the premise is rather silly, it's a charming way to tackle a decades-old message that usually feels like a high school lecture. And hey, a naked puzzle party doesn't sound all that bad. 

Via Osocio.

Click to Read More →

October 20, 2014, 6:51 PM EDT

Infographic: How to Tell Client Tricks From Treats This Halloween Mistress breaks it down

Every day is a bit spooky when you're dealing with clients. But this Halloween, ad agency Mistress has made a little chart you might find useful—how to tell whether your client's double-speak is a trick or a treat. It's notoriously hard to tell sometimes.

Top photo via Flickr.

October 20, 2014, 4:01 PM EDT

French Art Show About the Marquis de Sade Gets a Suitably Orgiastic Trailer (NSFW) Raunchy, but artistic

YouTube censors who greenlight nudity as long as it's artistic must have spent a fair bit of time on this video from the Musée d'Orsay in Paris—advertising an art show about the influence of the Marquis de Sade on representation of sexuality.

That's because almost every frame could be age-gated.

It was made by video artists David Freymond and Florent Michel. "In the end, it doesn't come off as something pornographic or obscene. It's rather beautiful, very aestheticized, like a painting by Renoir, Courbet, or a Rodin," Emmanuèle Peyret writes in Libération, per Artnet. "In brief, another artwork amid those already inhabiting the museum."

Video contains nudity and is NSFW.

October 20, 2014, 1:53 PM EDT

Here's Why Facebook Never Created a 'Dislike' Button Liking is universal, but negativity takes many forms, creator explains

As anyone who's posted something ostensibly insightful on Reddit knows, watching your comment get downvoted into a negative abyss can leave you feeling stung and downright pissed off.

That's exactly the kind of experience Facebook wanted to avoid when it actively decided not to create a "Dislike" button alongside the iconic thumbs-up Like button that debuted in early 2009.

In an interview with the creator of the Like button, former Facebook CTO Bret Taylor (who these days runs mobile app Quip), TechRadar reports that a Dislike button was often discussed but consistently scrapped because "the negativity of that button has a lot of unfortunate consequences."

While the Like button was born largely to unclutter feeds riddled with positive one-word comments like "wow" and "cool," Taylor says, Facebook felt that it was actually better to corner the more negative users into leaving a comment explaining their opinions.

"I have the feeling that if there were to be a 'Dislike' button is that you would end up with these really negative social aspects to it," Taylor says. "If you want to dislike something, you should probably write a comment, because there's probably a word for what you want to say."

October 20, 2014, 11:26 AM EDT


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