AdFreak | Adweek AdFreak | Adweek
Advertisement

Without Condoms, Threesome Night Becomes Puzzle Night in This Odd French PSA Don't let this happen to you

When the mood is right but you're all out of condoms, most amorous adventurers would simply run to the 24-hour pharmacy. But in France, the back-up plan seems to be a tad more mundane.

In a series of new anti-AIDS ads from TBWA Paris, the participants in a would-be threeway end up interlocking jigsaw puzzle pieces rather than limbs, and several couples find equally bland ways to spend their naked time together. 

"No condom, no sex," is the tagline for these spots for AIDES, the advocacy group behind a wide range of enjoyable videos.

While the premise is rather silly, it's a charming way to tackle a decades-old message that usually feels like a high school lecture. And hey, a naked puzzle party doesn't sound all that bad. 

Via Osocio.

Click to Read More →

October 20, 2014, 6:51 PM EDT

Infographic: How to Tell Client Tricks From Treats This Halloween Mistress breaks it down

Every day is a bit spooky when you're dealing with clients. But this Halloween, ad agency Mistress has made a little chart you might find useful—how to tell whether your client's double-speak is a trick or a treat. It's notoriously hard to tell sometimes.

Top photo via Flickr.

October 20, 2014, 4:01 PM EDT

French Art Show About the Marquis de Sade Gets a Suitably Orgiastic Trailer (NSFW) Raunchy, but artistic

YouTube censors who greenlight nudity as long as it's artistic must have spent a fair bit of time on this video from the Musée d'Orsay in Paris—advertising an art show about the influence of the Marquis de Sade on representation of sexuality.

That's because almost every frame could be age-gated.

It was made by video artists David Freymond and Florent Michel. "In the end, it doesn't come off as something pornographic or obscene. It's rather beautiful, very aestheticized, like a painting by Renoir, Courbet, or a Rodin," Emmanuèle Peyret writes in Libération, per Artnet. "In brief, another artwork amid those already inhabiting the museum."

Video contains nudity and is NSFW.

October 20, 2014, 1:53 PM EDT

Here's Why Facebook Never Created a 'Dislike' Button Liking is universal, but negativity takes many forms, creator explains

As anyone who's posted something ostensibly insightful on Reddit knows, watching your comment get downvoted into a negative abyss can leave you feeling stung and downright pissed off.

That's exactly the kind of experience Facebook wanted to avoid when it actively decided not to create a "Dislike" button alongside the iconic thumbs-up Like button that debuted in early 2009.

In an interview with the creator of the Like button, former Facebook CTO Bret Taylor (who these days runs mobile app Quip), TechRadar reports that a Dislike button was often discussed but consistently scrapped because "the negativity of that button has a lot of unfortunate consequences."

While the Like button was born largely to unclutter feeds riddled with positive one-word comments like "wow" and "cool," Taylor says, Facebook felt that it was actually better to corner the more negative users into leaving a comment explaining their opinions.

"I have the feeling that if there were to be a 'Dislike' button is that you would end up with these really negative social aspects to it," Taylor says. "If you want to dislike something, you should probably write a comment, because there's probably a word for what you want to say."

October 20, 2014, 11:26 AM EDT

Job-Hunting Creatives Disguise Their Portfolio as a Copy of Lürzer's Archive One sure way to get some press

It can be tough to get your work featured in the advertising magazine Lürzer's Archive. But René Schultz and Casper Christensen found a way around that.

The Danish art directors, who were looking for a job, went ahead and created their own physical replica of the creative magazine, filled it with their own work, and sent it to agencies. See how they did it—and whether it worked—in the video below.

As you might have guessed, the whole thing came full circle when the prank was written up in Lürzer's Archive itself. "Of course I was delighted with this gem," writes Lürzer's editor Michael Weinzettl. "They copied the magazine to perfection."

UPDATE: And guess who did this 10 years ago!

October 20, 2014, 11:08 AM EDT

David Beckham Invites You to Travel the World, Drinking His Scotch, in Ad From Guy Ritchie Meet the very stylish Haig Club

If you're the type of jet-setter who flies a seaplane to a Scottish estate so you can put on a tuxedo and have a drink with a handful of your posh friends, David Beckham would like you to buy some of his new whisky.

The recently retired soccer icon stars in this glitzy launch ad for Haig Club, a single grain scotch that Beckham produced with liquor giant Diageo and American Idol creator Simon Fuller. Filmmaker Guy Ritchie, a friend of Beckham's—who directed him in this H&M ad last year—directed this one, too (and makes a cameo as the fisherman under the bridge).



It's worth watching mostly for the gorgeous scenery (shot in the Scottish Highlands, at locations like Glen Affric). The people are pretty, too. Alt-J's "Left-Hand Free" serves as the soundtrack. The storyline is thin, leaving you free to focus on the lush trappings—not unlike a fashion or perfume ad. That's all the more appropriate, given that the bottle looks like it should hold something you splash on your person, not pour down your gullet.

Regardless, you should also be ready to drink it at the Great Wall, Easter Island, the Egyptian pyramids and Antarctica, among other places. In other words, get your travel budget in order—and don't forget to bring your point-and-shoot camera, because everyone still uses those.

October 20, 2014, 10:35 AM EDT

YouTube's Famous 'Slow Mo Guys' Get You Up to Speed in Ads for the Video Site They 'make every second epic'

The Slow Mo Guys are shifting into the fast lane.

As part of YouTube's ongoing effort to introduce its popular channel stars to a wider audience, Gavin Free and Dan Gruchy are appearing in a multimedia push that includes TV, print, billboard and online ads. The campaign, breaking now in the U.K., is tagged "You make every second epic," and also highlights Vice News and beauty vlog Zoella. (In the U.S., YouTubers like Bethany Mota and Michelle Phan starred in similar ads earlier this year.)

"YouTube stars are not only entertaining us through their quirky videos and updates, but building long-lasting relationships with their fans," says Ben McOwen Wilson, who oversees partnerships for the Google-owned service.



The 30-second Slow Mo Guys teaser shows highlights from some of their nearly 100 videos shot at 10,000 frames per second. Watermelons and paintballs explode in plumes of color, and a teacup tossed through the air disgorges its contents in caramel cascades. This sampling merely hints at the channel's treasure trove of dazzling footage, which has garnered almost 430 million total views and 4.5 million subscribers in the past four years.

It feels right that the Slow Mo Guys were chosen to take part in YouTube's mainstream crossover push, because their oeuvre encompasses elements of old and new media. Free and Gruchy condense the frantic, silly vibe of shows like You Can't Do That on Television and America's Funniest Home Videos into highly shareable bites. They add dashes of Bill Nye-style scientific curiosity and genuine artistry (some of their slow-motion work is amazing). Even their goofy Brit-bro personalities are in sync with the times, reminding viewers that these are average Joes using technology to create amazing stuff.

At times, the guys present serious, brand-centric material, including a couple of clips that showcase General Electric's cutting-edge tech. Such efforts are informative and boast hypnotic imagery, but the real fun comes from their sillier escapades. You'll gasp at the epic cuteness of dogs and cats frozen in mid-air, striking impossible ballet poses. You'll cringe as milky puke sluggishly slithers from Gruchy's twisted, lactose-tortured lips. You'll jump in your seat when dozens of mousetraps dance in an insanely prolonged (and painful) chain reaction.

These are awesome time wasters. No matter how slow the antics, the minutes fly by.

Click to Read More →

October 17, 2014, 2:37 PM EDT

This Suite of Fonts Was Made From the Handwriting of the Homeless Going beyond messages on cardboard

Homeless signs have been a font of ideas for creatives, but rarely has the focus been on the fonts themselves.

The Arrels Foundation in Barcelona has created Homelessfonts—typefaces based on the unique handwriting of the homeless people it helps. Each font comes with the story of the person who penned it and their personality. After all, few things are more personal than our handwriting.

The work not only helps fund the foundation, it humanizes the homeless and lets people see them as unique individuals, not as an amorphous problem. The video about the process is moving, but moreover, the fonts are actually good. The glyphs were captured with fat Sharpies on poster board and then transformed by volunteer typographers.



If you are a typographer, you can donate your time and expertise to help create more fonts. If you just like the concept, you can download a free app to use the fonts in social media (be a nice person and make a donation, too). And if you're a brand, you can purchase the fonts and the stories that come with them for professional use at surprisingly affordable prices.

Samples of the scripts as they might appear on packaging are included, so you can see just how beautiful and unique the font—and the people behind them—truly are.

October 17, 2014, 1:42 PM EDT

So Happy Together? You and Android Lollipop Should Never Be Apart, Ads Say OS connects all your devices all the time

Android wants to be with you. Everywhere. All the time. Is that so wrong?

The Google-developed platform doubles down on the "togetherness" theme in work touting its new Android 5.0 Lollipop OS. That system runs across mobile, wearables, TVs and a range of other devices, including the Nexus 6 smartphone (built by Motorola) and Nexus 9 tablet (from HTC), both of which dropped this week amid much fanfare.

"Be together. Not the same" is Android's new tagline, introduced in a trio of 30-second animated spots on Sunday during the season premiere of AMC's The Walking Dead. The South Park-y visuals are strictly G-rated and give the ads, which teased the Nexus 6 and 9 handsets a few days before their Wednesday release, a distinctive flair.

Those clips were followed by a pair of minute-long spots that expand the campaign's message by emphasizing the "And" in Android. One mixes animation with live-action shots of diverse folks enjoying life and interacting in positive ways with technology (backed by the inspired musical choice of Andrew W.K.'s anthemic "Party Hard").



The second spot ditches the animation but really lays out Google's vision. A voiceover begins: "Remember back in school, when you either invited the new kid over to your table, or you didn't? If you did, that was a cool move. That was an and move. 'And moves' take guts, but they can mean everything."

Footage of the Wright Brothers and Martin Luther King Jr. follows, stressing how inclusiveness combined with independent thought drives innovation and change. "Everyone doing the same thing won't move us forward. Everyone doing their own thing, together, can."

Click to Read More →

October 17, 2014, 12:55 PM EDT

What's in McDonald's Food, Anyway? Ex-MythBuster Grant Imahara Is Hired to Find Out Transparency campaign echoes one from Canada

Does McDonald's put horsemeat in its burgers? What about pink slime? Would you feed McDonald's food to your kids?

So many questions. But now, taking its cues from a well-received transparency campaign from McDonald's Canada, the chain is responding to whatever hate its American critics want to throw at it. And it's hired former MythBusters host Grant Imahara to be your third-party, completely unbiased, totally trustworthy, quasi-celebrity McMyth investigator.



Imahara's first three videos have already dropped, where he visits a Cargill plant and answers the following: Is McDonald's beef real (and are there eyelids in there)? Why are the patties frozen (when fresh should theoretically be much tastier)? Why are the burgers so cheap (you get what you pay for, right)?

It's everything you'd expect from a hard-reboot, Domino's-style brand turnaround. What I most admire is that they're letting the comment feed on YouTube be just as brutal as it wants to be. And man, is it brutal. It's hard to tell the legit processed-food concerns from the horsemeat crazies.



Though honestly, that's good for Micky D's. The more they can discredit the really nutty folks by letting them be themselves—and there are some excellent conspiracy theorists blowing up the feed—the less McDonald's itself actually needs to say.

That said, I'm probably not going to bite the bullet like Imahara and munch a Big Mac anytime soon. But those sodium acid pyrophosphate fries, man. Who can resist those fries?

Click to Read More →

October 17, 2014, 12:23 PM EDT

Advertisement

Sign up for AdFreak Newsletters

Advertisement
About AdFreak

AdFreak is your daily blog of the best and worst of creativity in advertising, media, marketing and design. Follow us as we celebrate (and skewer) the latest, greatest, quirkiest and freakiest commercials, promos, trailers, posters, billboards, logos and package designs around. Edited by Adweek's Tim Nudd and David Griner.

Click to Subscribe to AdFreak RSS